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2007 Team Stealing Stats


Mashed Potatoes

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I did a lot of work to put this information together so hopefully it isn't readily available!

TEAM SB CS CS%

ANA 107 31 22.5%

ARI 88 42 32.3%

ATL 98 30 23.4%

BAL 109 32 22.7%

BOS 107 32 23.0%

CHC 116 24 17.1%

CHW 98 23 19.0%

CIN 88 31 26.1%

CLE 93 46 33.1%

COL 96 25 20.7%

DET 73 31 29.8%

FLA 94 33 26.0%

HOU 84 28 25.0%

KCR 70 26 27.1%

LAD 96 46 32.4%

MIL 99 24 19.5%

MIN 65 41 38.7%

NYM 105 29 21.6%

NYY 136 44 24.4%

OAK 101 26 20.5%

PHI 84 39 31.7%

PIT 110 35 24.1%

SDP 189 20 9.6%

SEA 69 45 39.5%

SFG 77 33 30.0%

STL 58 34 37.0%

TBD 96 44 31.4%

TEX 98 47 32.4%

TOR 134 24 15.2%

WSN 80 37 31.6%

-15 of the 32 teams were above the 25% threshold, AKA they would've been better off never attempting a steal.

-7 teams were in between 22-25%, their gain can be seen as negligible.

-Combining the above two notes, 22 of the 32 teams saw a negligible or negative effect on their team from stealing.

-"Meanwhile, unless the Padres and Rockies get thrown out today about 170 times — which is rare in the typical 54-out game — the league will set a new record for stolen-base percentage. (It’s currently 74.4% for the season, up from last year’s record of 71.4%, but tonight’s stats count toward the regular season.)" http://blogs.wsj.com/numbersguy/the-numbers-of-the-2007-mlb-season-196/

-The Padres are ridiculous.

Hopefully yall can draw some more meaningful conclusions from the data.

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I thought i heard that 5 or less catchers threw out runners at a rate of over 30% this year....Can't remember the number but i was shocked at how low it was(i am sure it was based on catchers who caught a certain number or innings)

I wonder why that is?

A very good question.

I suspect one big part is that people have figured out a more systematic or scientific approach to it. Just a few years ago, I think it was much less common to put a stopwatch on a P's motion, a stopwatch on a C's time to get a ball to 2B, and a stopwatch on a runner's time to get from point-X to 2B, etc. Once you reliably have that info, it becomes much more of a straightforward numbers game that tells you when to go and when not to, which means less exposure to CS. But I'm just guessing...

Is there any way to get a good answer?

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A very good question.

I suspect one big part is that people have figured out a more systematic or scientific approach to it. Just a few years ago, I think it was much less common to put a stopwatch on a P's motion, a stopwatch on a C's time to get a ball to 2B, and a stopwatch on a runner's time to get from point-X to 2B, etc. Once you reliably have that info, it becomes much more of a straightforward numbers game that tells you when to go and when not to, which means less exposure to CS. But I'm just guessing...

Is there any way to get a good answer?

Probably not...It is probably just one of those statisical anomolies that happens every once in a while...Just some flukey thing.

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Probably not...It is probably just one of those statisical anomolies that happens every once in a while...Just some flukey thing.

Although the year before was also a record season in stolen-base % (71.4%). This suggests a gradual movement rather than a fluke, although I'm not sure how to look up other seasons.

One potential cause to explore is how tightly umpires are enforcing balks. Maybe they've made a point to crack down on illegal pickoff moves. This year pitchers felt less comfortable holding runners and as a result the runners are getting better jumps...

Another theory is that all these new age sabermetric teams have de-emphasized defense in favor of a strong bat at the catcher position.

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Another theory is that all these new age sabermetric teams have de-emphasized defense in favor of a strong bat at the catcher position.

That's certainly an idea. If somebody cared enough, and knew how, that could probably be investigated somehow.

Not sure how, though.

Same thing with the possibility that teams don't try to run unless they're pretty sure it will work.

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Although the year before was also a record season in stolen-base % (71.4%). This suggests a gradual movement rather than a fluke, although I'm not sure how to look up other seasons.

One potential cause to explore is how tightly umpires are enforcing balks. Maybe they've made a point to crack down on illegal pickoff moves. This year pitchers felt less comfortable holding runners and as a result the runners are getting better jumps...

Another theory is that all these new age sabermetric teams have de-emphasized defense in favor of a strong bat at the catcher position.

That's a good point....Maybe it is just as simple as the idea that teams seem to run less than they did before and maybe because of that, teams get caught off guard.

Everyone in most team's lineup seem to be able to hit 10+ homers...You run the risk of running out of an inning, so it just isn't done as much.

Plus, maybe catchers are working less on their throwing more than before.

And it seems like their are fewer and fewer pitchers with good pickoff moves and that hold runners well.

They just don't focus on the little things.

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And it seems like their are fewer and fewer pitchers with good pickoff moves and that hold runners well.

That too.

Pappelbon sure dodged a bullet last night when he basically gave both 2B and 3B to whoever-it-was who got on 1st. Doing that just can't be OK... but it seems like it is these days.

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That too.

Pappelbon sure dodged a bullet last night when he basically gave both 2B and 3B to whoever-it-was who got on 1st. Doing that just can't be OK... but it seems like it is these days.

Well, to the credit of Paps, he knew he only had to get the guy out at the plate.

I certainly think there are times, especially with 2 outs, when pitchers get too wrapped up in the base runner and their concentration goes away from the batter.

Paps didn't do that...I think that was smart to be honest with you.

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Well, to the credit of Paps, he knew he only had to get the guy out at the plate.

I certainly think there are times, especially with 2 outs, when pitchers get too wrapped up in the base runner and their concentration goes away from the batter.

Paps didn't do that...I think that was smart to be honest with you.

Well, a cheap single, or a bobbled grounder, or a bad throw, or a WP, or a PB, or a balk, or etc. would have made it seem highly dumb... but, yeah, he got away with it...

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Not the only reason surely, but as teams embrace sabermetric priciples more and more, they're probably paying more attention to the risks versus the rewards.

They're more likely to risk stolen base attempts in better percentage matchups than in previous years.

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