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2011 Veterans Committee Nominees Announced


ShaneDawg85

Who deserves to be selected by the Veterans Committee for induction?  

20 members have voted

  1. 1. Who deserves to be selected by the Veterans Committee for induction?

    • Vida Blue
    • Dave Concepcion
      0
    • Steve Garvey
    • Ron Guidry
    • Tommy John
    • Al Oliver
    • Ted Simmons
    • Rusty Staub
      0
    • Billy Martin (Manager)


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The veterans committee for the Hall of Fame Class of 2011 was announced today, and there are a lot of familiar names on the ballot. Probably the most notable fact is that George Steinbrenner is on the ballot for the first time this year. Based on who is on the list, who do you feel merits being inducted?

It should be noted that according to wikipedia, our very own Hall of Famers Eddie Murray, Jim Palmer, and Frank Robinson are serving on the electorate committee, as well as Andy MacPhail.

I'm sure there won't be any hesitation to blame MacPhail if someone illegitimate is left out, or gets in.;)

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I can't vote in the poll because three of my final four aren't in there (as you said).

Marvin Miller had the biggest impact on the sport of baseball, positive and negative, of anyone since...I don't know, Al Spalding? Babe Ruth? Abner Doubleday (;))? He has to go in, and hopefully the final two voters will be convinced this year.

George Steinbrenner redefined what an owner could be, again both positive and negative, as baseball evolved through the free-agent and television ages.

Pat Gillick made the playoffs as general manager of four different clubs, winning the World Series twice with Toronto and once with Philadelphia.

Ted Simmons was a regular catcher for 13 seasons. During that time, he averaged 126 games catching and 143 overall. He had over 2000 hits and 200 home runs in that span, with career totals in 21 seasons approaching 2500 and 250 respectively. His OPS was .815, adjusting to a 126 OPS+, and for his career it was .785 and 117. He's up there with the Mickey Cochranes and Roy Campanellas among HOF catchers.

So those are my four.

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I think the only no-doubt candidate is Miller. Simmons and Steinbrenner have decent cases. Staub had a better career than Jim Rice. Pretty much everyone on the list had a better career than someone who's already in the Hall.

Martin is an interesting case, in that he's kind of like Earl Weaver, if Earl had drunk a fifth of bourbon before first pitch every single game.

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I think the only no-doubt candidate is Miller. Simmons and Steinbrenner have decent cases.

I think you can say that Miller and Steinbrenner did more to raise players' salaries than anyone else in baseball history! ;)

As much as I hate the Yankees, I don't see how Steinbrenner doesn't go in the Hall of Fame. Miller obviously belongs in.

None of the players wow me.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Sparky Lyle should have been in a long time ago.

I remember the 1977 ALCS. After pitching two innings in Game Three, Lyle came out of the bullpen to pitch six scoreless innings on no rest to save the Yankees in Game Four, when they were facing elimination in the best-of-five series. Lyle wasn't done. He came back in Game Five (again on no rest) to pitch 1 and 2/3 more scorleless innings to wrap up the series for the Yankees, 3 games to 2.

.

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I can't vote in the poll because three of my final four aren't in there (as you said).

Marvin Miller had the biggest impact on the sport of baseball, positive and negative, of anyone since...I don't know, Al Spalding? Babe Ruth? Abner Doubleday (;))? He has to go in, and hopefully the final two voters will be convinced this year.

George Steinbrenner redefined what an owner could be, again both positive and negative, as baseball evolved through the free-agent and television ages.

Pat Gillick made the playoffs as general manager of four different clubs, winning the World Series twice with Toronto and once with Philadelphia.

Ted Simmons was a regular catcher for 13 seasons. During that time, he averaged 126 games catching and 143 overall. He had over 2000 hits and 200 home runs in that span, with career totals in 21 seasons approaching 2500 and 250 respectively. His OPS was .815, adjusting to a 126 OPS+, and for his career it was .785 and 117. He's up there with the Mickey Cochranes and Roy Campanellas among HOF catchers.

So those are my four.

I agree with all of these except Pat Gillick. He might be a guy I'd put in eventually, but not yet.

I think the only guy who actually gets in this year is Steinbrenner, though.

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Miller and Steinbrenner, absolutely.

Among the players, Simmons is the only one who merits serious consideration — a better HOF case than many of the catchers already there, certainly. I've always had the impression that he was a divisive and largely unpopular figure among Cards fans. Not that that means anything.

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Here's a great Simmons article from two years ago.

http://www.hardballtimes.com/main/article/does-ted-simmons-belong-in-the-hall-of-fame/

The argument against really boils down to the fact that he only spent 72% of his time at catcher, but in absolute terms he still caught a lot of games--his total would be the fourth most in the Hall. And most of his time at other positions came later in his career when he wasn't padding his offensive numbers.

He has to have been a somewhat unpopular figure to have been bounced on the first ballot when so many others hung around for many years.

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  • 3 weeks later...
The "crime" of this ballot is that Bobby Grich isn't on it.
Pat Gillick has been elected to the Hall of Fame.

No one else has, it appears.

Looking at the selections since 2007, after the year they inducted every Negro Leaguer besides Buck O'Neill, it looks like they fall into a few categories:

1) Managers

2) Executives from the ownership side

3) No-doubt inner circle types (Ripken, Gwynn, Henderson), or players far above established HOF standards for their position (Gossage)

4) Players who had reputations significantly above contributions (Dawson, Rice)

If you're just a player who contributed to successful teams with more wins than an average, current HOFer, you have basically no shot. Such as Grich, Trammell, Whitaker, Blyleven, Santo, etc.

The voters made their decisions in 1970 or 1980, and ain't no facts changing their minds.

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