Jump to content

Defense of ARod: "He's not that smart"


Flip217

Recommended Posts

From the NY Post

"In four years I was with him 24 hours a day, and not one time did I ever hear, see or get wind of anything having to do with performance enhancing drugs, steroids, HGH, anything," said Borzello, now the Dodgers' catching instructor. "No way, with as much as this guy trusted me, would he have kept that part of his life secret from me. He trusted me with everything, and I was with him every day all day long. It would have been impossible to show me everything behind the curtain except for this. He is not that bright to be able to pull that off." --Mike Borzello, former Yankees' bullpen catcher.

Whew! I bet Alex is really glad to get this sort of quality defense from former friends and colleagues.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Testimonials like that are nearly worthless.

"No way, with as much as this guy trusted me, would he have kept that part of his life secret from me. He trusted me with everything,..."

Oh, really? Roger Clemens would have us to believe that his wife got steroids injections from his personal trainer and that both of them concealed that fact from Roger for several years.

I suspect that virtually everyone conceals something from those near and dear to them. Plus, I kind of doubt if Borzello is quite as tight with A-Rod as he would have us to believe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From the NY Post

"In four years I was with him 24 hours a day, and not one time did I ever hear, see or get wind of anything having to do with performance enhancing drugs, steroids, HGH, anything," said Borzello, now the Dodgers' catching instructor. "No way, with as much as this guy trusted me, would he have kept that part of his life secret from me. He trusted me with everything, and I was with him every day all day long. It would have been impossible to show me everything behind the curtain except for this. He is not that bright to be able to pull that off." --Mike Borzello, former Yankees' bullpen catcher.

Whew! I bet Alex is really glad to get this sort of quality defense from former friends and colleagues.

I think the bigger story here is that ARod was sleeping with a lowly bullpen catcher. ;)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Testimonials like that are nearly worthless.

"No way, with as much as this guy trusted me, would he have kept that part of his life secret from me. He trusted me with everything,..."

Oh, really? Roger Clemens would have us to believe that his wife got steroids injections from his personal trainer and that both of them concealed that fact from Roger for several years.

I suspect that virtually everyone conceals something from those near and dear to them. Plus, I kind of doubt if Borzello is quite as tight with A-Rod as he would have us to believe.

Exactly. The "24-7" thing is an obvious gross exaggeration. Nobody knows everything about even their closest friends. Larry Bigbie lived with Brian Roberts and didn't hide his own regular steroid use from him, yet he didn't find out Roberts had tried the stuff until a year after the fact. Those were two teammates the same age who came up through the minor leagues together and lived together at several different times, not a superstar player and his team's bullpen catcher!

Plus, for all we know this Borzello guy could have been ARod's dealer and be trying to cover his own heinie. :D

By the way, it's not like I care whether ARod did steroids or not. On one hand I'd like him to be proven guilty along with Jeter to silence a few Yankees fans who won't shut up about how "clean" they are, but on principal I think this continued obsession with who did and who didn't has got to get old for people at some point. Lots and lots and lots of baseball players used steroids. Some still do. If we catch the ones using today and give them a punishment that fits the crime, great, but no matter how clean ARod is or isn't it's not like it's going to change the fact that MLB did itself and its fans a major disservice by letting the steroid situation get so far out of control, or the fact that a lot of fans and reporters have let their obsession with it get way out of control.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Exactly. The "24-7" thing is an obvious gross exaggeration. Nobody knows everything about even their closest friends. Larry Bigbie lived with Brian Roberts and didn't hide his own regular steroid use from him, yet he didn't find out Roberts had tried the stuff until a year after the fact. Those were two teammates the same age who came up through the minor leagues together and lived together at several different times, not a superstar player and his team's bullpen catcher!

Plus, for all we know this Borzello guy could have been ARod's dealer and be trying to cover his own heinie. :D

By the way, it's not like I care whether ARod did steroids or not. On one hand I'd like him to be proven guilty along with Jeter to silence a few Yankees fans who won't shut up about how "clean" they are, but on principal I think this continued obsession with who did and who didn't has got to get old for people at some point. Lots and lots and lots of baseball players used steroids. Some still do. If we catch the ones using today and give them a punishment that fits the crime, great, but no matter how clean ARod is or isn't it's not like it's going to change the fact that MLB did itself and its fans a major disservice by letting the steroid situation get so far out of control, or the fact that a lot of fans and reporters have let their obsession with it get way out of control.

Sheffield and Giambi isn't enough for you?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sheffield and Giambi isn't enough for you?

Sheffield and Giambi were never Yankee heroes. It has to be ARod or Jeter because they're the ones about whom Yankees fans say "ARod/Jeter has accomplished X, Y, and Z in his career and he did it ALL 100% clean because of his pure, natural talent in a time when everyone else was juicing."

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sheffield and Giambi were never Yankee heroes. It has to be ARod or Jeter because they're the ones about whom Yankees fans say "ARod/Jeter has accomplished X, Y, and Z in his career and he did it ALL 100% clean because of his pure, natural talent in a time when everyone else was juicing."

The yankee fans I know can careless about A-Rod.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

...on principal I think this continued obsession with who did and who didn't has got to get old for people at some point. Lots and lots and lots of baseball players used steroids.

Exactly! Some of those who used will continue to be exposed, but most of them probably will never be identified. We might as well acknowledge that we don't know who used steroids and who didn't. All records established over the past 40-60 years are "tainted" to an unknowable degree, so we should simply accept that and move forward. A witch hunt to find the unfindable simply wastes everybody's time and resources. As law enforcement officials track down dealers and get them to identify their customers, we may add a few names to the "proven users" list, depending upon the reliability of the evidence, but a large number of the "usual suspects" have to be placed into the "unproven" category.

Some still do. If we catch the ones using today and give them a punishment that fits the crime, great,...

The rules have changed and those caught in the future should have no excuses or mitigating circumstances. We should move forward with testing programs and investigations that will ensure the game is as clean as possible of PEDs.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If we catch the ones using today and give them a punishment that fits the crime, great, but no matter how clean ARod is or isn't it's not like it's going to change the fact that MLB did itself and its fans a major disservice by letting the steroid situation get so far out of control, or the fact that a lot of fans and reporters have let their obsession with it get way out of control.

I absolutely agree with you, but they're two totally separate issues.

It's true that MLB let the steroid situation get out of control, and they rightly deserve whatever blame we heap upon them.

That doesn't mean we and/or the media and/or MLB shouldn't pay attention to, and investigate claims, relating to use by current players.

You're right -- some are obsessed by the issue and seem to filter everything else through it. But Canseco -- as hard as it is for me to write this -- seems to have a certain amount of credibility on this issue (although I believe he leaks information selectively to promote himself and his soon-to-be-released books). And that's why this story is getting attention, IMHO.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The yankee fans I know can careless about A-Rod.

Most of the ones I know don't care about ARod until it comes time to beat the dead Barry Bonds horse. Then it's all about how clean and pure ARod is and how great it's going to be when he breaks Bonds' record in a Yankee uniform.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I absolutely agree with you, but they're two totally separate issues.

It's true that MLB let the steroid situation get out of control, and they rightly deserve whatever blame we heap upon them.

That doesn't mean we and/or the media and/or MLB shouldn't pay attention to, and investigate claims, relating to use by current players.

You're right -- some are obsessed by the issue and seem to filter everything else through it. But Canseco -- as hard as it is for me to write this -- seems to have a certain amount of credibility on this issue (although I believe he leaks information selectively to promote himself and his soon-to-be-released books). And that's why this story is getting attention, IMHO.

If Canseco has somewhat concrete information that indicates ARod is currently using steroids or has done so since the big crackdown in 2005, then sure they should investigate it; but if Canseco's "information" is simply that he introduced him to an unnamed steroid dealer many years ago, that's not worth investigating. We're not talking about cracking the crime of the century here, we're debating whether yet another baseball player in the steroid era used steroids. The "need to know" because it's a sexy issue shouldn't supersede reasonable presumptions of innocence until proven guilty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

if Canseco's "information" is simply that he introduced him to an unnamed steroid dealer many years ago, that's not worth investigating.

I guess this is where we disagree. I believe Canseco knows first hand information on actual users and dealers. If he says he introduced a current player to a steroid dealer, I think that's reason enough to investigate that connection a bit further. You're absolutely right though -- there's no need to abandon a presumption of innocence.

I think in fairness to the players already investigated, you have to consider investigating additional claims and allegations against other players, always bearing in mind the need to separate frivolous or unsubstantiated claims from ones with apparent merit.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I guess this is where we disagree. I believe Canseco knows first hand information on actual users and dealers. If he says he introduced a current player to a steroid dealer, I think that's reason enough to investigate that connection a bit further. You're absolutely right though -- there's no need to abandon a presumption of innocence.

I think in fairness to the players already investigated, you have to consider investigating additional claims and allegations against other players, always bearing in mind the need to separate frivolous or unsubstantiated claims from ones with apparent merit.

Problem is, Canseco has so far refused to even give the name of the alleged steroid dealer. If there were a name and address and reasonable suspicion that this person actually sold steroids that would be different.

As for the players who have already been witchhunted, I think many of them would prefer for others not to have to go through the same humiliation they've been through.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

As for the players who have already been witchhunted, I think many of them would prefer for others not to have to go through the same humiliation they've been through.

I guess so. But my first reaction, if I was one of those witch-hunted players, would be to wonder "How come they dropped the hammer on me but these other guys are getting a free pass?".

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.



  • Posts

    • Edwin Amparo Pos: SS Bats: S Throws: R Age (as of Jun 30th) : 17 2022 Level: DSL Bio: Almost a mirror image of Leandro Arias (#30), Amparo actually out performed his counterpart both offensively and defensively in their debut seasons. Up and down to start the season, the 17-year old ended the season with a great August slashing .373/.424/.593/1.017 in 66 PAs over 17 games. He doesn’t have the footspeed that Arias has, he showed better power though hit hits the ball on the ground more and has less of a line drive rate. Defensively he’s considered to have good tools for sticking at shortstop with the arm to stay there.
    • Hudson Haskin Pos: OF Bats: R Throws: R Age (as of Jun 30th) : 23 2022 Level: AA Bio: After two full seasons in the minor leagues, it still hard to really know what to make of this outfield prospect. Drafted out of Tulane University in the 2nd round of the COVID shortened 2020 draft, Haskin has made a steady rise through the system after spending all of 2022 in AA at Bowie. His overall numbers looked decent with him slashing .264/.367/.455/.821 in 466 PAs, but if take away a white-hot first seven games of the season that included a three HR game, he slashed a mediocre .243/.353/.406/.759 with 11 HR and a 42-93 BB-K ratio in 439 PAs the rest of the way. He didn’t pull the ball as much in 2022, but his power still his mostly to his pull side. His line drive rate fell to a career low 18% and while he can impact the baseball at times, he doesn’t appear to have high exit velocities. While he doesn’t walk much (9.2%), he also doesn’t swing and miss a ton and does a decent job of cutting down the swing on two-strikes. He struggles at times against good offspeed pitches and upper level velocity in the upper part of the zone suggesting he might be a bit of a guess hitter. Defensively Haskin can play all three outfield positions but he’s better in left due to just average footspeed, marginal instincts, and a below average arm. While Haskin does not have a major weakness in his skill set, he also doesn’t have a carrying tool to make him a major league regular unless it’s for a second division team. He’s probably more suited as the right-handed portion of a left field platoon or as a 4th/5th outfielder.
    • Chayce McDermott Throws: RHP Age (as of Jun 30th): 23 2022 Level: A+/AA Bio: Acquired in the Trey Mancini deal from Houston, this 23-year old right-hander can miss bats, but his command has a long way to go. The Ball State product brings a 92-96 MPH fastball that has good life and carry in the zone and he gets his fair share of swing and miss on it up in the zone. He offsets that with two different breaking ball, a 76-80 MPH curveball and a 84-87 MPH slider. Of the two, the slider is the better pitch but he struggles to command the pitch and it has inconsistent break. When it’s on, it’s a true strike out pitch. The change is his 4th offering and can flash average movement at times, but it’s a very inconsistent pitch as well. McDermott gets above average swinging strike percentage (17.1%) and K/9 (13.1/9) but those numbers have come down as he’s gone up the ladder as the more mature hitters don’t chase at much. Due to the arm strength and repertoire, he’s been developed as a starter, but he doesn’t throw nearly enough strikes and it takes him a lot of pitches to get through four and five inning stints against minor leaguers. This all suggests a move to the bullpen should be in his future, and at 24-years old next season, it might be best to make that conversation sooner than later. McDermott’s stuff could play up in a relief role where his lack of command won’t be as big of a factor. The 6-3 right-hander could potentially move quickly in a relief role and has the stuff to be a high leverage reliever if he can get his stuff over more consistently. He’ll most likely start the year in Bowie (AA) but it will be interesting to see what role they try and develop him at this stage of his career and age.
    • Trace Bright Throws: RHP Age (as of Jun 30th): 21 2022 Level: FCL/A Bio: This 6-foot-4 right-hander is all about projection after an inconsistent year at Auburn, but there is some upside here. A fast riser during his junior campaign at Auburn University, Bright sat 90-93 early in the season but ended up sitting 93-96, touching 97 by year’s end. The lanky righthander offsets that good fastball with a 79-81mph curveball, a hard breaking mid-80’s slider, and a well below average change. He was a workhorse in college making every start this past spring. He’s built like a starter with a nice easy fluid motion and his 95-96 looks effortless. For Bright, his future is all about two things. Will the command come around and can he develop a usable change to defend against lefties? Can’t take too much out of his taste of pro ball at the end of last season, but hitters didn’t seem too comfortable against him, and there was very little loud contact off him. Bright will be developed as a starter and he could very well be much higher on this list next year after his first full pro season. He may be the biggest sleeper in the 21-30 range on this list.
    • Be interesting to see how much more the Orioles spend on free agents. If they kept Mancini and did not do the buyout and also Lyles would have been $21 million in salary Do they spend $21 million in free agent signings? 
    • Michael Brantley should be our top bat target. 
    • The most intriguing options to me are via trade. I would be inquiring on any of Burnes, Woodruff, Gallen, Singer, Quantrill, Snell, Stroman, and Kelly. I'd be open to trading anyone outside our top three depending on who we get back.   Eovaldi and Bassit are still possibilities through FA.
  • Popular Contributors

×
×
  • Create New...