Jump to content

How smaller fields have encouraged station to station baserunning


Frobby

Recommended Posts

I just noticed this today, in the course of researching some players mentioned in the Travis Snider thread on the Orioles board. Back in the 1960's and 70's, baserunners took an extra base (2 on a single, 3 on a double) about 59-60% of the time on a ball to RF. Today, it's only about 53% of the time. I guess part of it is that it's harder to advance in the smaller ballparks of today, and the other part is, it makes sense to avoid outs on the bases and hope someone knocks one over the fence.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I want to see a (comparatively) wacky park that's about 295-305 down the lines and 385-400 in the alleys, and 415-430 to dead center. Basically a park where you can pull the ball down the line and get a lucky home run, while a gapper can end up as a triple or an ITP homer if you can't chase one down.

Then I'd try and get 3 center fielders in the outfield.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do they have advancement percentages going further back in time? Because you have to think there were parks in the past where the outfielders played so shallow and walls so short that it was unthinkable to advance on a ball in the gap. If I recall correctly League Park in Cleveland was maybe 250 down the RF line and barely 300 in the gap with a huge corrugated metal wall looming over the infield. Baker Bowl was tiny. Of course the Polo Grounds was well under 300' down the lines but centerfield went on forever. The few years the Dodgers played at the LA Coliseum it was so short to left that I think some balls over the screen were just ruled doubles. And in 1884 the Chicago White Sox played at Lakefront Park, which apparently had no dimension over 300' to any field. Those Sox had something like half of all the 20-homer seasons prior to Babe Ruth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

You mean big slow guys like Frank Howard playing the OF? :)

Yes. Part of the reason for the decline and fall of triples is that teams are less willing to put up with Delmon Young, Greg Luzinski, Frank Howard, Pete Incaviglia, Ken Singleton, John Kruk, and similar regularly and slowly chasing balls up the gap.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do they have advancement percentages going further back in time? Because you have to think there were parks in the past where the outfielders played so shallow and walls so short that it was unthinkable to advance on a ball in the gap. If I recall correctly League Park in Cleveland was maybe 250 down the RF line and barely 300 in the gap with a huge corrugated metal wall looming over the infield. Baker Bowl was tiny. Of course the Polo Grounds was well under 300' down the lines but centerfield went on forever. The few years the Dodgers played at the LA Coliseum it was so short to left that I think some balls over the screen were just ruled doubles. And in 1884 the Chicago White Sox played at Lakefront Park, which apparently had no dimension over 300' to any field. Those Sox had something like half of all the 20-homer seasons prior to Babe Ruth.

BB-ref's stats on outfielders holding runners currently go back to 1940. Out of curiosity, I had a look at how Duke Snider fared when he moved from Ebbetts Field to Dodger Stadium. The answer is what you'd expect. He held 43.8% of runners his last year in Brooklyn, 36.1% his first year in LA.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BB-ref's stats on outfielders holding runners currently go back to 1940. Out of curiosity, I had a look at how Duke Snider fared when he moved from Ebbetts Field to Dodger Stadium. The answer is what you'd expect. He held 43.8% of runners his last year in Brooklyn, 36.1% his first year in LA.

The Dodgers played at the LA Coliseum from 1958-61, which you probably already know. But for the young 'uns here, the Coliseum was/is a wildly exaggerated mirror image of Ebbetts Field. At Ebbetts it was 296 to right (as there was a street at about 300'). At the Coliseum it was literally about 250' to left with a giant screen, but right field kind of went on forever as this was really a football/track stadium. So... as you mention you'd expect RFers like Snider to have very different numbers in the two parks.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

BB-ref's stats on outfielders holding runners currently go back to 1940. Out of curiosity, I had a look at how Duke Snider fared when he moved from Ebbetts Field to Dodger Stadium. The answer is what you'd expect. He held 43.8% of runners his last year in Brooklyn, 36.1% his first year in LA.

A similar comparison in the other direction:

Willie Mays held 48.7% and 48.8% of runners the last two years at the Polo Grounds; his percentage bumped up a smidgeon to 50.6% and 54.4% the two years at the more cozy (at least in center field) Seals Stadium.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The Dodgers played at the LA Coliseum from 1958-61, which you probably already know. But for the young 'uns here, the Coliseum was/is a wildly exaggerated mirror image of Ebbetts Field. At Ebbetts it was 296 to right (as there was a street at about 300'). At the Coliseum it was literally about 250' to left with a giant screen, but right field kind of went on forever as this was really a football/track stadium. So... as you mention you'd expect RFers like Snider to have very different numbers in the two parks.

http://www.ballparksofbaseball.com/past/LAColiseum.htm

This park is hilarious. A middle schooler could probably it one out to LF.

251 down the LF line, 300 down the RF line, 420 to dead center, what looks like at least 460 to the RF power alley.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Posts

    • Mountcastle, despite the vitriol thrown at him from some folks in the game threads, leads Vladdy in rWAR, fWAR, and OPS+.
    • Again, the rough sex myth. The only person out there having sex like that is Ted Bundy. Bauer is out there seemingly choking every woman he encounters out. He’s a sick hombre. He felt bullied in high school, then at UCLA, so now he’s bullying these women and choking them out.  It’s not Normal.  https://meaww.com/ted-bundys-ex-sandy-details-how-serial-killer-tried-to-drown-her-and-choked-her-during-sex Educate yourself on Ted Bundy aka Trevor Bauer. The fanboys that root for a man that wants to take advantage of someone weaker is pathetic. 
    • Here’s a quote from an article today by MLBTradderumors’ Anthony Franco “The past few days haven’t been good for teams looking to acquire controllable starting pitching. On Friday, Angels southpaw Patrick Sandovalcame out of his start shaking his arm. The Halos put him on the 15-day injured list the next day with an elbow strain. One day later, the Marlins announced that Jesús Luzardo was being shut down with a lumbar stress reaction in his back. Miami almost immediately put him on the 60-day injured list — ruling him out into August.”   It seems that the pitching pool has shrunk even more. So here’s a thought: how about bludgeoning our opponents instead of pitching them? Just accept that our pitching going forward is going to be fraught with walks and long, sometimes very long fly balls, and insure that we give back much better than we get? There’s no doubt that some teams have better pitching, but nobody has better offense. So, instead of paying ever higher prices for pitching that won’t necessarily be worth the price or adequate to fill the need, let’s just admit the problem and solve it with a potent offense? That would require sit downs for Mullins, Cowser, and Hays, but they should be fairly easy to replace? What sayeth the crowd?
    • I think the Blue Jay fans are shutting down.
    • Voted all Orioles. I would rather vote for Hays over Judge.
    • There are multiple starter targets that make sense to me, to varying degrees, if their teams would be agreeable to dealing them. Tarik Skubal (27) from the Tigers, with 2.5 years of control.  Cal Quantrill (29) of the Rockies, with 1.5 years of control.   Jack Flaherty (28) of the Tigers, who is a FA after the season. Erick Fedde (31) of the White Sox, who has 1.5 years remaining on his 2/$15m contract. Tyler Anderson (34) of the Angels, who has 1.5 years remaining on his 3/$39m contract. As I detailed earlier, I would not prefer we seek to trade for Crochet at this time, nor Soriano from the Mets.  JP Sears is someone that's pitched poorly this season, so I think I'd not look his way either. The closer we get to the deadline, more teams will sell, adding more starters to this short list.
  • Popular Contributors

  • Popular Now

×
×
  • Create New...