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Orioles swinging at more first pitches, but still finding success there


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For you stat lovers. Seems not to prove much

From the Sun:

This year's edition of the Orioles, through 91 games, have swung at a higher rate of first pitches than they have in decades, and more than all but three other major league teams this year. There's not a lot to suggest that's the root of the offensive struggles, though.

Around baseball, the league-average first-pitch swing rate is 28.9, putting three Orioles regulars above the middle mark.

Center fielder Adam Jones swings at the first pitch he sees in 47.1 percent of his at-bats, second behind only Oakland Athletics outfielder Billy Burns, who swings at 48.5 percent of his first pitches.

Jimmy Paredes is sixth-highest among qualifiers with 45.8 percent, and Chris Davis is at No. 24 in baseball at 38.4 percent. Only the Nationals have more ranked that high, with four players among the top 21.

However, what the Orioles do to open at-bats doesn't seem to be the problem with their recent run-scoring woes.

The Orioles hit .346/.352/.563 with 19 home runs, 24 doubles, and 67 RBIs when putting the first pitch in play. The league-average on first pitches is .334/.342/.533, and while those rates go up as you get into hitters counts for both the Orioles and the rest of the league, the Orioles don't get cheated early.

They also have a nearly identical OPS in at-bats when they swing at the first pitch (.734 in 1,054 at-bats) as they do when they take the first pitch (.735 in 1,995 at-bats). That equilibrium holds true across the league, too.

http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/baltimore-sports-blog/bal-orioles-swinging-at-more-first-pitches-but-still-finding-success-there-20150720-story.html

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For you stat lovers. Seems not to prove much

From the Sun:

This year's edition of the Orioles, through 91 games, have swung at a higher rate of first pitches than they have in decades, and more than all but three other major league teams this year. There's not a lot to suggest that's the root of the offensive struggles, though.

Around baseball, the league-average first-pitch swing rate is 28.9, putting three Orioles regulars above the middle mark.

Center fielder Adam Jones swings at the first pitch he sees in 47.1 percent of his at-bats, second behind only Oakland Athletics outfielder Billy Burns, who swings at 48.5 percent of his first pitches.

Jimmy Paredes is sixth-highest among qualifiers with 45.8 percent, and Chris Davis is at No. 24 in baseball at 38.4 percent. Only the Nationals have more ranked that high, with four players among the top 21.

However, what the Orioles do to open at-bats doesn't seem to be the problem with their recent run-scoring woes.

The Orioles hit .346/.352/.563 with 19 home runs, 24 doubles, and 67 RBIs when putting the first pitch in play. The league-average on first pitches is .334/.342/.533, and while those rates go up as you get into hitters counts for both the Orioles and the rest of the league, the Orioles don't get cheated early.

They also have a nearly identical OPS in at-bats when they swing at the first pitch (.734 in 1,054 at-bats) as they do when they take the first pitch (.735 in 1,995 at-bats). That equilibrium holds true across the league, too.

http://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/baltimore-sports-blog/bal-orioles-swinging-at-more-first-pitches-but-still-finding-success-there-20150720-story.html

The most important determinant of success at hitting is to get a good pitch to hit. Letting any hitters pitch go is a mistake, no matter what the count.

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How is their OBP higher than their average when putting the first pitch in play? If anything I'd expect it to be lower due to sacrifices.

They are counting 6 HBP in there, vs. 10 sacrifices. That's a .375 OBP in those 16 PA. Technically, getting hit by a pitch isn't really putting the ball in play, but that's how they counted it.

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