Jump to content

A very random question


Pedro Cerrano

Recommended Posts

Why is it more advantageous? Because there are more righty pitchers? What about the shift and the fact that a ton of lefties can't hit left-handed pitchers a lick.

My dad is one of those weird guys. He said he was taught to do it because it's a couple steps closer to 1st. Apparently it makes a big difference. :noidea:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 33
  • Created
  • Last Reply
Why is it more advantageous? Because there are more righty pitchers? What about the shift and the fact that a ton of lefties can't hit left-handed pitchers a lick.

It's advantageous because you have the platoon advantage 60-70% of the time, and you are a step or so closer to first base. And there's no particular reason besides tradition that we think of batting right or left handed as being tied to being right or left handed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I do pretty much everything lefty except throw and swing. I can swing lefty pretty well but am naturally right-handed there.

Writing, eating, shooting, guitar - all lefty. I think the only real reason I throw righty is because my parents just bought me a cheap glove from the store when I started playing and it happened to be a glove for a righty.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's advantageous because you have the platoon advantage 60-70% of the time, and you are a step or so closer to first base. And there's no particular reason besides tradition that we think of batting right or left handed as being tied to being right or left handed.

Are you sure about that? I have no concrete evidence either way, but I would tend to think that a right handed person (especially a child with limited strength) would have a lot better control of the bat with the right hand higher up on the bat, along with added strength using the right leg as the plant leg.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are you sure about that? I have no concrete evidence either way, but I would tend to think that a right handed person (especially a child with limited strength) would have a lot better control of the bat with the right hand higher up on the bat, along with added strength using the right leg as the plant leg.

I have to think that the number of righties who hit lefty is pretty decent evidence that it's not much of a factor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And here I thought I was unique because I was one of the few kids growing up in my town that threw lefty but hit righty. Anyhow, I think the reason you see more lefty hitters but righty throwers is because as already said it's seen as advantageous. I read Leigh Monville's Ted Williams biography over the winter and Ted Williams basically said he did everything in his life right-handed but hitting. A kid on my kid brother's little league team told me similar when I asked him. As for me personally, I think I just started hitting right handed because it felt more natural which is odd because I do everything else left handed. If I could do it again, I'd probably hit left handed from the start though. Fun fact but Rickey Henderson is the only bat righty/throw lefty position player in the HoF. There are others in but they're all pitchers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My dad is one of those weird guys. He said he was taught to do it because it's a couple steps closer to 1st. Apparently it makes a big difference. :noidea:

In 2011 there were 235 right handed batters who had 100+ PAs. Their median batting average was about .251. Median OPS+ was 93.

There were 153 lefties who had 100+ PAs. Their median batting average was .256. Median OPS+ was 93.

From 2000-2011 59 righties hit .325 or better, while 35 lefties did. 37% lefties among .325 hitters, while by population distribution you'd expect 39%.

Maybe there's not much to it. Although that's certainly not a definitive study.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

And here I thought I was unique because I was one of the few kids growing up in my town that threw lefty but hit righty. Anyhow, I think the reason you see more lefty hitters but righty throwers is because as already said it's seen as advantageous. I read Leigh Monville's Ted Williams biography over the winter and Ted Williams basically said he did everything in his life right-handed but hitting. A kid on my kid brother's little league team told me similar when I asked him. As for me personally, I think I just started hitting right handed because it felt more natural which is odd because I do everything else left handed. If I could do it again, I'd probably hit left handed from the start though. Fun fact but Rickey Henderson is the only bat righty/throw lefty position player in the HoF. There are others in but they're all pitchers.

That combination is clearly a disadvantage. Unless you're a pitcher. Otherwise you've disqualified yourself from playing four of the positions in the field, and possibly put yourself at a very small disadvantage at bat.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That combination is clearly a disadvantage. Unless you're a pitcher. Otherwise you've disqualified yourself from playing four of the positions in the field, and possibly put yourself at a very small disadvantage at bat.

I often wonder if a player who plays the OF because they are left-handed would have been incredible in the IF if they were righty. Imagine if Johnny Damon was secretly the best defensive 2b of all time and we'd never know?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

That combination is clearly a disadvantage. Unless you're a pitcher. Otherwise you've disqualified yourself from playing four of the positions in the field, and possibly put yourself at a very small disadvantage at bat.

Yeah it is. I think it's somehow easier to teach a natural right hander to hit left handed than it would be a natural lefty to throw right handed. I tried playing catch right handed once as a gag and my shoulder felt sore pretty quickly. As I said, if I could do it over again, I'd probably would have just hit left handed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Related to the original topic but I don't think I've ever seen a left handed knuckleball pitcher in a game ever. I've done a simplified one when throwing to my brothers in the yard and field before but I've never actually seen a lefty knuckler in the game. All the famous knucklers- Wakefield, Wilhelm, and others that I know were all right handed. Is there a mechanical reason for that or is it just coincidence?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I often wonder if a player who plays the OF because they are left-handed would have been incredible in the IF if they were righty. Imagine if Johnny Damon was secretly the best defensive 2b of all time and we'd never know?

Yes, it's a near certainty that there have been incredible fielders who never got the chance to play the infield because they were left-handed. Mike Squires and Don Mattingly would probably have been gold glove third basemen in Bizzarro World where they run the bases clockwise.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Related to the original topic but I don't think I've ever seen a left handed knuckleball pitcher in a game ever. I've done a simplified one when throwing to my brothers in the yard and field before but I've never actually seen a lefty knuckler in the game. All the famous knucklers- Wakefield, Wilhelm, and others that I know were all right handed. Is there a mechanical reason for that or is it just coincidence?

Dan Boone was a lefty knuckleballer who threw a few innings for the O's in the early 90s. I'm sure that prior to 1960 there were dozens or even hundreds of lefty knuckleballers. 1960 was roughly the dividing line between throwing knucklers as just another pitch, and the belief that you had to either be a knuckleballer or not. The Senators of the late 40s often had a rotation with 3-4 guys who threw knucklers at least sometimes.

In 1972 Wilbur Wood threw 376 2/3 innings as a left-handed knuckleballer.

This list includes over 50 lefties who threw kucklers.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dan Boone was a lefty knuckleballer who threw a few innings for the O's in the early 90s. I'm sure that prior to 1960 there were dozens or even hundreds of lefty knuckleballers. 1960 was roughly the dividing line between throwing knucklers as just another pitch, and the belief that you had to either be a knuckleballer or not. The Senators of the late 40s often had a rotation with 3-4 guys who threw knucklers at least sometimes.

In 1972 Wilbur Wood threw 376 2/3 innings as a left-handed knuckleballer.

Interesting. Had no idea that knuckleballs were that common in the past. Wonder why it became that you had to be a knuckler ot not. Another thing I rarely see if ever are submariner starters. I remember Chad Bradford and of course now see Darren O'Day with our O's but both those guys are relievers. A guy I kind of emulated as a lefty submariner was Brad Clontz with the Braves. One of those dime a dozen relievers but I kind of liked him because he was a sidearming lefty and a Virginia native. I imagine submarine starters don't exist because doing that 100 pitches a game is different than 10-20 with a reliever. I converted from sidearm to overhand when I became a starter because the coach though I'd throw my arm out doing that starting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


  • Posts

    • It’s probably fairly inevitable that Grayson will need TJ at some point in his career. Velo increases the risk. However, it’s very common for all pitchers, regardless of velo. The biggest thing Grayson has going for him is that he’s made it to age 24 without a shoulder or elbow injury (at least that I can recall), which already separates him from many others in the high velo club. The best predictor of future injuries is past injuries, and while he did have that lat issue that knocked him out for a fair bit his record is pretty clean in that respect.  Also, it’s more the conventional baseball wisdom than something I’m aware of being supported in stats, but Grayson has a prototypical pitcher’s frame and in theory that could help his durability. It doesn’t seem like he generates his velo from a max effort delivery.
    • It was a fastball.   If you’re bailing out on a fastball from a LHP with a 3/4 delivery like that I think there’s a problem but if you think it’s perfectly fine you’re entitled to your opinion.
    • It’s been a few years, but I seem to recall there was some talk about his playing 2B when Duquette was still here. Might have been some kind of instructional league chatter or something. It certainly cannot hurt. 
    • I'm not sure that I understand all of your post. In particular the mentioning of Elias and Adley in comparison to Belichick and Brady. That is an apples to strawberries comparison at best. Both are fruit and red and round, otherwise unalike. Brady's role as QB and BB's role as head coach and GM is far different and much more directly central to success than Elias GM and certainly Adley as a catcher. However, when speaking about Hal Steinbrenner being an impediment to Elias remaining as GM of the Orioles long term, I don't see it. NY is a totally different market than here. You are NEVER going to be given 4 years for a total tear down and all the future building moves for the sake of the present won't fly in NY. Yes, I am sure than other owners like Steinbrenner envy what the O's have amassed. It's why they changed the draft rules. However, some owners know that the path that Elias used to get the Orioles to where they are is not viable in their markets as they know how alienating it would be to their fanbase. This is to say, that if Elias wants to be here, Rubenstein has the pockets that are plenty deep enough to make that happen. It's probably going to be a similar contract to what the Mets are paying Stearns and the Dodgers are paying Friedman.
    • If he can't locate the breaking stuff and throw the fastball with a good location he gets destroyed. I keep hearing how good his stuff is, but his pitch values are not good on anything but his offspeed pitch. His fastball had negative run value last year and it does again this year. Barrel and hard hit % are both up this year too. I guess he'll live or die by the changeup if it's working or not. Whiff rate and K% are good not great according to statcast.
    • What about Means and Kremer?
    • If the Sacramento A's need a second baseman I am fine with this. 
  • Popular Contributors

×
×
  • Create New...