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Orioles, Cubs, KC Royals worst in majors at developing power hitters


webbrick2010

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You can say the O's didn't develop sluggers, but if you go back during the 13 year below .500 era, they didn't develop much of anything. Roberts, Markakis??? Ever watch the YES network when they play the O's and they chuckle at Jeter's and some other player stats against the O's? The played 18,19 games against some pretty lousy pitching staffs and teams. Hell, the O's may be instrumental in Jeter's HOF electability.

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This list is not surprising. Thanks for compiling it. I would have given Werth to the O's though.

The Orioles have been pretty bad a developing successful hitters period, let alone power hitters, over the last 20 or so years.

No it is not surprising. The Orioles have been pretty poor at developing Major League talent over the last 20 years, not just pitching. It does seem to be getting a little better...it needs to continue to do so.

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Please explain how Seattle is responsible for Adam Jones' power development? He had never hit more than 25 in the minors and did not hit 30 until he was here for 5 seasons. You cannot just look at what team drafted the player when determining who is responsible for their power development. Also, Chris Davis never got a shot with Texas, but you give them credit for developing his power. Say Steve Pearce catches fire the second half and finishes with 30 HR, do the Pirates get credit for that simply because they drafted him? What if Nolan Reimold hits 30 HRs next year for Toronto, do the Orioles get credit for that?

Well, the Orioles just can't develop power. Period. They teach way too patient an approach.

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Outside of Machado, when was the last time the Orioles drafted, developed and had someone play for the big league team that hit 30 homers? 25?

My point is that it's easy to identify who the studs are in other systems when you're trying to make a trade. But when you're drafting the Billy Rowell's of the world, it's another story altogether.

Machado was just too good for the Orioles to mess up, IMO.

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Outside of Machado, when was the last time the Orioles drafted, developed and had someone play for the big league team that hit 30 homers? 25?

My point is that it's easy to identify who the studs are in other systems when you're trying to make a trade. But when you're drafting the Billy Rowell's of the world, it's another story altogether.

Machado was just too good for the Orioles to mess up, IMO.

Schoop will count some day. Walker too maybe.

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Outside of Machado, when was the last time the Orioles drafted, developed and had someone play for the big league team that hit 30 homers? 25?

My point is that it's easy to identify who the studs are in other systems when you're trying to make a trade. But when you're drafting the Billy Rowell's of the world, it's another story altogether.

Machado was just too good for the Orioles to mess up, IMO.

I think it is also really hard to determine which draftees are the result of enhancement or are having recreational medical issues beyond trash bags of weed.

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Outside of Machado, when was the last time the Orioles drafted, developed and had someone play for the big league team that hit 30 homers? 25?

My point is that it's easy to identify who the studs are in other systems when you're trying to make a trade. But when you're drafting the Billy Rowell's of the world, it's another story altogether.

Machado was just too good for the Orioles to mess up, IMO.

Give Schoop another year or two and he'll be on the list.

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J

Any discussion of developing players that gives the credit for Davis and Jones elsewhere doesn't interest me much. Every bit of their ML success has come in an Orioles' uniform, so why do I care where they played in the minors? I'm not saying the Orioles should get the "credit" for them either. I'm just saying maybe giving credit at all is kind of silly.

The point is to acquire players to help the major league team win games. The Orioles have had and continue to have plenty of ML power. If anything, they could use less power and more OBP.

David Ortiz is the best power hitter for the Boston Red Sox over the last 10-20 year period and he was a salary dump by the Twins back in the day. Didn't cost a pick or any players to acquire. They didn't spend a second at the minor league level "developing" him. Yet, he has been a HUGE factor for them.

My point is that a one dimensional analysis of where a player happened to start in the minors is unlikely to lead to any sort of valuable correlation or epiphany.

Good points here. Development is a process that doesn't end the day a player reaches the majors.

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