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Offensive drop in production over the last 5, 10, 15 years


wildcard

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Something that Frobby said struck me. He mentioned that Markakis' drop in production is not as bad when considering that the league OPS has also dropped. I haven't been giving this point its proper importance. And quite frankly I don't know what kind of importance I should be giving it. Thus I am asking for your comments on the subject.

The major league average OPS in 2000 was 782 according to ESPN.

The major league average OPS in 2006 was 768

The major league average OPS in 2011 was 719

The major league average OPS in 2014 was 700

Just guessing off the top of my head I see two facts that are causing this:

1) The enforce of baseball's drug policy

2) The defensive shifting that has become increasing normal

I know I am probably missing factors that are causing the offensive decline. And I expect that the OH posters can tell me about them.

Here is another point that gets me.

Pearce can have a season where he puts up a 930 OPS

Davis can have a 1.004 OPS in 2013

Cruz can have a 859 OPS in spite of the league OPS decreasing.

What does this mean in view of baseball offensive decline?

And Markakis drops from a 897 OPS in 2008 to a 728 OPS in 2014 and as far as we know is neither a drug user nor someone that the shifts affects. Most teams play him straight up because he sprays the ball all over the field.

So help me get a handle on this subject because obviously I don't have one.

Thanks in advance

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This is why OPS+ is such a helpful stat especially in today's game when many players have stats in both a horrible hitter's era and one of the greatest hitting era's the game has ever seen.

Markakis

06 - 106

07 - 121

08 - 136

09 - 108

10 - 120

11 - 106

12 - 126

13 - 88

14 - 107

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PitchFX has a lot to do with it. It has caused a significant growth in the strike zone.

Here is an interesting article that says that PitchFX has cause the strike zone to expand over the last 5 years and caused more low strikes to be called. It makes the batter swing at lower pitches which causes more ground balls. For your consideration.

http://www.foxsports.com/mlb/just-a-bit-outside/story/the-impact-of-the-evolving-strike-zone-090914

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Here is an interesting article that says that PitchFX has cause the strike zone to expand over the last 5 years and caused more low strikes to be called. It makes the batter swing at lower pitches which causes more ground balls. For your consideration.

http://www.foxsports.com/mlb/just-a-bit-outside/story/the-impact-of-the-evolving-strike-zone-090914

There have been a number of pieces written about the topic this year.

Larger strike zone = more strikeouts + less walks = diminished scoring.

Last I checked (I have not seen this season's numbers) batters are producing a pretty solid OPS if they put the ball in play.

Me, I wonder if Britton's success this season was a direct result of the downward expansion in the strikezone.

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There have been a number of pieces written about the topic this year.

Larger strike zone = more strikeouts + less walks = diminished scoring.

Last I checked (I have not seen this season's numbers) batters are producing a pretty solid OPS if they put the ball in play.

Me, I wonder if Britton's success this season was a direct result of the downward expansion in the strikezone.

That makes sense.

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There have been a number of pieces written about the topic this year.

Larger strike zone = more strikeouts + less walks = diminished scoring.

Last I checked (I have not seen this season's numbers) batters are producing a pretty solid OPS if they put the ball in play.

Me, I wonder if Britton's success this season was a direct result of the downward expansion in the strikezone.

Likewise, a batter with a finely tuned batters eye is likely to be more affected by a larger strike zone than a hitter who swings at everything. This sounds like it could be affecting Markakis.

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Likewise, a batter with a finely tuned batters eye is likely to be more affected by a larger strike zone than a hitter who swings at everything. This sounds like it could be affecting Markakis.

I don't think this is to blame for his lower power numbers. His K/BB rates last season are within 10% of his career averages. Unless he is compensating in a different way then the rest of the league and eschewing strikeouts in favor of poor contact.

If he is doing that then the hitting coach and him have to have a long talk.

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