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Zack Greinke


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DODGERS PITCHERS, CONSECUTIVE SCORELESS INNINGS STREAKS

1968: Don Drysdale (58.67)

1988: Orel Hershiser (59.00) *

2014: Clayton Kershaw (41.00)

2015: Zack Greinke (43.67) **

* Streak does not include 8 scoreless innings pitched in Game 1 of the 1988 NLCS or 2/3 scoreless innings pitched on April 5, 1989 to open the next season.

** Streak still Active

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DODGERS PITCHERS, CONSECUTIVE SCORELESS INNINGS STREAKS

1968: Don Drysdale (58.67)

1988: Orel Hershiser (59.00) *

2014: Clayton Kershaw (41.00)

2015: Zack Greinke (43.67) **

* Streak does not include 8 scoreless innings pitched in Game 1 of the 1988 NLCS or 2/3 scoreless innings pitched on April 5, 1989 to open the next season.

** Streak still Active

I guess you could say that the Dodgers play a lot of games in which the conditions favor the pitchers.

The Drysdale streak featured six straight complete game shutouts. The Hershiser streak featured five complete game shutouts followed by 10 innings of shutout ball in a game the Dodgers eventually lost in 16 innings. That was in Hershiser's final start of the regular season. Lord knows how long his scoreless streak might have run if there had been more regular season games left to play. As it was, he pitched 8 shutout innings in Game 1 of the ALDS before finally yielding some runs in the 9th.

Greinke's streak is impressive, but he has thrown 7.0, 6.0, 7.2, 7.0, 8.0 and 8.0 innings. That's less impressive to me than throwing all those complete game shutouts.

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If people believe pitchers can no longer expand the strike zone due like Mssrs Maddux and Glavine used to, watch Greinke work. Nobody else gets those pitches 6 inches off the plate - and on BOTH SIDES of the plate. Talk about working the ump.

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I guess you could say that the Dodgers play a lot of games in which the conditions favor the pitchers.

The Drysdale streak featured six straight complete game shutouts. The Hershiser streak featured five complete game shutouts followed by 10 innings of shutout ball in a game the Dodgers eventually lost in 16 innings. That was in Hershiser's final start of the regular season. Lord knows how long his scoreless streak might have run if there had been more regular season games left to play. As it was, he pitched 8 shutout innings in Game 1 of the ALDS before finally yielding some runs in the 9th.

Greinke's streak is impressive, but he has thrown 7.0, 6.0, 7.2, 7.0, 8.0 and 8.0 innings. That's less impressive to me than throwing all those complete game shutouts.

While I agree on some level, it's not exactly a fair comparison considering the way the game is managed now with pitch counts and specialized relief pitchers.

When I was living there I remember watching a game in which Kershaw had struck out 12 hitters and SO the competition and Mattingly took him out at end of 7 IP with his pitch count at 92. In the middle of summer. They lost.

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While I agree on some level, it's not exactly a fair comparison considering the way the game is managed now with pitch counts and specialized relief pitchers.

When I was living there I remember watching a game in which Kershaw had struck out 12 hitters and SO the competition and Mattingly took him out at end of 7 IP with his pitch count at 92. In the middle of summer. They lost.

It's probably not fair on a number of levels. Drysdale's streak occurred in the most pitcher-friendly season in modern baseball history, 1968, with a higher mound and larger strike zone that are used currently. The average team scored 3.42 runs per game that year. Hershiser's 1988 streak was in a much more run-neutral environment (4.14 runs per game, compared to 4.07 this year). There were many more complete games thrown in those years (average of 45 per team in 1968, 24 per team in 1988, vs. 4 in 2014).

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Bryce Harper said he was "unimpressed" with Greinke yesterday. Funny. I was "unimpressed" by the Nats hitting all weekend.

Harper's a whiny little baby. I happened to see one of his at bats, where he was complaining about a pitch being called a strike that probably was a strike, and if not, was maybe an inch off the plate.

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Bryce Harper said he was "unimpressed" with Greinke yesterday. Funny. I was "unimpressed" by the Nats hitting all weekend.
Harper's a whiny little baby. I happened to see one of his at bats, where he was complaining about a pitch being called a strike that probably was a strike, and if not, was maybe an inch off the plate.

Agree, I'm unimpressed with Harper ever since he's been in the league with his mouth and actions. He's a prima dona.

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Agree, I'm unimpressed with Harper ever since he's been in the league with his mouth and actions. He's a prima dona.

Unbelievable talent though. Give him time to grow up.

I actually think he's handled it better than many kids who get endless praise and make too much money too young. Think about it, he isn't flaming out, he's doing his job extremely well, isn't a criminal or alcoholic. He takes himself too seriously but I don't think he's been that bad at all.

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