Jump to content

2014 Chris Tillman Today


Il BuonO

Recommended Posts

Chris was around the plate most of the day. I saw a stat, somebody else throw it up here if you have it, that said he was 70% strikes. He didn't give up a walk until his final frame. Nothing to complain about there. The times he gave up the hits were when he was behind, but overall he was ok. Nothing spectacular, I'm sure he'd like to have gone deeper.

The Red Sox sure did nothing to help, fouling off a number of good pitches he made. Pedroia(big shock) was particularly troublesome. But as he has found a way to do in the past, he pitched himself out of trouble nad minimized the damage.

I'll take it.

IP 5

H 7

R 0

SO 4

BB 1

2014 ERA 1.80

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 385
  • Created
  • Last Reply
Chris was around the plate most of the day. I saw a stat, somebody else throw it up here if you have it, that said he was 70% strikes. He didn't give up a walk until his final frame. Nothing to complain about there. The times he gave up the hits were when he was behind, but overall he was ok. Nothing spectacular, I'm sure he'd like to have gone deeper.

The Red Sox sure did nothing to help, fouling off a number of good pitches he made. Pedroia(big shock) was particularly troublesome. But as he has found a way to do in the past, he pitched himself out of trouble and minimized the damage.

I'll take it.

IP 5

H 7

R 0

SO 4

BB 1

2014 ERA 1.80

I'll take it, too.

Being 1-0 instead of 0-1 makes this day off A WHOLE LOT EASIER TO STOMACH.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Chris was around the plate most of the day. I saw a stat, somebody else throw it up here if you have it, that said he was 70% strikes.

He threw 71 strikes in 104 pitches which is 68.3%. By comparison, Tillman finished the 2013 season with a 64.0% strike rate and is at 62.4% for his career.

36.6% of the pitches he threw were fouled off. He is 30.3% for his career, 30.9% in 2013, and the MLB average during Tillman's major league career is 27.0%. That supports what was already pretty evident that his high pitch count was in part driven by the Red Sox' ability to foul off pitches.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Red Sox are good at driving up pitch counts no doubt.

I think Tillman needs to get better at getting some weak contact in order to keep his pitch count down. Using off speed to keep hitters off balance for instance. This is what could take him to the next level.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IP 5

H 7

R 1

SO 4

BB 1

2014 ERA 1.80

Let me give you an OFFNY vitamin supplement, buddy. :)

Pitches: 104 (71 Strikes, 33 Balls)

*******************

PITCHES BY INNINGS

20 (16 Strikes, 4 Balls)

19 (12 Strikes, 7 Balls)

22 (16 Strikes, 6 Balls)

18 (11 Strikes, 7 Balls)

25 (16 Strikes, 9 Balls)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Let me give you an OFFNY vitamin supplement, buddy. :)

Pitches: 104 (71 Strikes, 33 Balls)

*******************

PITCHES BY INNINGS

20 (16 Strikes, 4 Balls)

19 (12 Strikes, 7 Balls)

22 (16 Strikes, 6 Balls)

18 (11 Strikes, 7 Balls)

25 (16 Strikes, 9 Balls)

Thx, buddy, you are the master. Rep returned.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


  • Posts

    • That research makes me wonder if a Club's typical number of 5-4-3 double plays could get as high as 50-60.    I think those pivots get counted as chances and shortstops don't get similar ones except 3-6-3's, of which I believe Ryan Mountcastle has about two in his career. B-Ref shows about 115 grounded double plays/team last year, so 50's probably a too high guess.    Its probably more like 80-85 up the middle, 30-35 around the horn.
    • I believe Westburg will be a good but light version of a Bergman type player. Want to see Mayo play at the MLB level before making his comparison 
    • I think this is probably right, but I’m interested to see if he’s able to minimize some of his flaws this year.  He seemed to be making some progress in the second half last year, though it could have just been a prolonged hot streak.  Jury’s still out a little IMO.    As mentioned, I also think Westburg has a lot more in the tank than he showed during his decent major league debut.   
    • Would that have to do with the elimination of the shift? In 2022 and prior, you’d have SS and 3B getting chances on the right side.
    • It matters if you think there is a significant upside gap between Westburg and Mayo. I agree if you feel good about Westburg as an everyday player the pressure on Mayo's glove is less.     Clay Davenport's six-year forecasts basically envision Mayo as a 3-win player and Westburg as a 2-win player. Somewhere around that range is a tipping point where Sigbots gain inner peace letting a player play 155 games.     I think Mayo might be that, and Westburg isn't.
    • The old adage is you take someone at the more important position and if you have to, move them down the spectrum.  If you draft a 2B (ie Norby) down the spectrum could be LF or DH.  I’ve read some reports on Termarr Johnson where there are some doubts on his future at 2B. Holliday was drafted as a SS.  Maybe he could even be okay or better there but we have the luxury of moving him down the spectrum.  
    • Everyone's time is limited. I think Mayo and Westburg are more likely to be members of the 2026 club but I'd rather not rush to move Mayo off third.
  • Popular Contributors

×
×
  • Create New...