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How long will Buck stick with Jim Presley?


wildcard

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Okay but the park they play in isn't going to change. And park factors probably don't change that much from year to year, especially for some place like Coors Field (assuming that's still the name).

So you're general thesis is that park factors don't matter, if I'm understanding correctly. Teams who play at Coors Field score a ton of runs, even when they aren't good. Good offenses score less runs if you put them in Petco Park. These factors have to be accounted for. On a smaller scale, the Orioles runs scored are inflated by playing 81 games in a park that historically inflates runs and more notably, home runs. The Orioles would not score as many runs if they played 81 games at Tropicana Field. That doesn't mean they are not as good offensively, it just means they play in a different park. However, just going by runs scored you'd see a decline.

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But the point is to objectively analyze whether the O's approach' date=' philosophy, etc., is "good." How do we do that? There are certain things you can point to, one being the overall amount of runs scored. But his point is that can be influenced by a bunch of other things that your approach and philosophy aren't really completely controlling per se. So there is value, within the context of this discussion, in trying to equalize all factors and then look at the numbers to get a better idea about how beneficial, or how much of a hindrance, the O's approach is.[/quote']

Or to simple say, with the 40 man roster we have now, do you think our hitters have an approach that suits their talents?

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Or to simple say, with the 40 man roster we have now, do you think our hitters have an approach that suits their talents?

Right, and I have no idea. I don't think we can make guys like Young and Jones be more patient. That seems like it has to come from an entire organizational approach to scouting and development. So I'm fine with somebody saying with the players we have, our approach is maximizing their talent. Seems about right to me.

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Sure, runs need to be put in context. Park factors and competition play a major role in how many runs a team scores. Adjusted offensive stats are much more useful. For example, the Colorado Rockies scored the 3rd most runs in baseball this year. They were far from the 3rd best offense in baseball. By wRC+, they had a 99 (100 is league average) and were 13th in MLB. That is a much better indicator of their true offensive prowess. The Rays scored the fewest runs in the AL, but were equal to the Rockies by wRC+ at 99. However, the Rockies scored 143 more runs.

I do agree with you that league, division and home field all influence offensive stats. I think people sometimes follow stats like wRC+ too slavishly, however. I remember after the 2013 season, some posters were arguing that based on adjusted stats, Tampa was actually a better offensive team than the Orioles. I didn't buy it then, and I certainly don't buy it now. The Orioles are a dangerous team no matter where they play.

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I do agree with you that league, division and home field all influence offensive stats. I think people sometimes follow stats like wRC+ too slavishly, however. I remember after the 2013 season, some posters were arguing that based on adjusted stats, Tampa was actually a better offensive team than the Orioles. I didn't buy it then, and I certainly don't buy it now. The Orioles are a dangerous team no matter where they play.

Anywhere they play.

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Right' date=' and I have no idea. I don't think we can make guys like Young and Jones be more patient. That seems like it has to come from an entire organizational approach to scouting and development. So I'm fine with somebody saying with the players we have, our approach is maximizing their talent. Seems about right to me.[/quote']

Here is my hypothesis. They is what they is. And you don't teach at the major league level.

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Right' date=' and I have no idea. I don't think we can make guys like Young and Jones be more patient. That seems like it has to come from an entire organizational approach to scouting and development. So I'm fine with somebody saying with the players we have, our approach is maximizing their talent. Seems about right to me.[/quote']

I believe that with strong players with good bat speed in today's power deprived leagues, that it is good to swing hard. You are going to be out 70 percent of the time anyway.

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Does it have to be all or nothing?

Can't we have a no. 1 and maybe 2 batter that are OBP focused and let the joneses of the team swing away?

I think it works if it is a team approach. And now since power is down, it doesn't work much even then.

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I do agree with you that league, division and home field all influence offensive stats. I think people sometimes follow stats like wRC+ too slavishly, however. I remember after the 2013 season, some posters were arguing that based on adjusted stats, Tampa was actually a better offensive team than the Orioles. I didn't buy it then, and I certainly don't buy it now. The Orioles are a dangerous team no matter where they play.

Tampa probably was a little better in 2013, they clearly were not in 2014.

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I believe that with strong players with good bat speed in today's power deprived leagues, that it is good to swing hard. You are going to be out 70 percent of the time anyway.

This part is not true, unless you're aiming to get out more than average. The two best offensive clubs in baseball had the two highest OBPs in baseball, that is not coincidence. The new run environment hasn't made it less important to get on base.

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This part is not true, unless you're aiming to get out more than average. The two best offensive clubs in baseball had the two highest OBPs in baseball, that is not coincidence. The new run environment hasn't made it less important to get on base.

I don't consider the .13 to be something I needed to address in my broad brush statement. In fact, with power, I might be being generous to neglect the .13. It is probably less than that. I assume that guys with a few more infield hits push the average up. And they are not usually the power hitters. Only Adam Jones.

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