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TT: The most productive Oriole in their history could surprise you!


Tony-OH

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I was too young to really remember Bobby Grich with the Orioles. But looking back at his baseball reference page, he really was one of the best players to play for the Orioles. Despite being a very good shortstop in the minor leagues, he moved to second base with the Orioles due to the glove wizardry of Mark Belanger. He was so good at second base defensively that he put up 11.3 dWAR in 786 games. In fact, Grich had a 3.9 dWAR season in 1973. Combined with Belangers' 4.0 dWAR and I can only imagine how good the up the middle defense was that year.

No slouch at the plate either, Grich put up a .777 OPS in his Orioles career which becomes even better when you realize that was good for a 127 OPS+. His 36 WAR produced in 786 games makes him one of the most productive Orioles ever at a per game basis (.046 WPG), perhaps the most productive if using WAR as the standard. By comparison Brooks Robinson (.027), Cal Ripken (.032), Eddie Murray (.031), Frank Robinson (.039) and Manny Machado (.039) all put up less WPG in their Orioles careers.

It's unfortunate that the Orioles weren't interested in retaining the high priced free agents that year and let Grich, Reggie Jackson, and Wayne Garland all walk after the 1976 season. Imagine how much better the Orioles could have been if they were able to open up the wallet and keep Grich an Oriole. Thankfully, the Southern Californian raised Grich walked away from a lucrative Yankees offer and signed with his hometown Angels.

He retired after the 1986 season at age 37. He put up 70.9 WAR over his 17 seasons, never once having a WAR lower than 1.9 in a full season. He put up the 7th most WAR of any second baseman in the history of the game and the only one in the top ten not in the Hall of Fame.

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I was too young to really remember Bobby Grich with the Orioles. But looking back at his baseball reference page, he really was one of the best players to play for the Orioles. Despite being a very good shortstop in the minor leagues, he moved to second base with the Orioles due to the glove wizardry of Mark Belanger. He was so good at second base defensively that he put up 11.3 dWAR in 786 games. In fact, Grich had a 3.9 dWAR season in 1973. Combined with Belangers' 4.0 dWAR and I can only imagine how good the up the middle defense was that year.

No slouch at the plate either, Grich put up a .777 OPS in his Orioles career which becomes even better when you realize that was good for a 127 OPS+. His 36 WAR produced in 786 games makes him one of the most productive Orioles ever at a per game basis (.046 WPG), perhaps the most productive if using WAR as the standard. By comparison Brooks Robinson (.027), Cal Ripken (.032), Eddie Murray (.031), Frank Robinson (.039) and Manny Machado (.039) all put up less WPG in their Orioles careers.

It's unfortunate that the Orioles weren't interested in retaining the high priced free agents that year and let Grich, Reggie Jackson, and Wayne Garland all walk after the 1976 season. Imagine how much better the Orioles could have been if they were able to open up the wallet and keep Grich an Oriole. Thankfully, the Southern Californian raised Grich walked away from a lucrative Yankees offer and signed with his hometown Angels.

He retired after the 1986 season at age 37. He put up 70.9 WAR over his 17 seasons, never once having a WAR lower than 1.9 in a full season. He put up the 7th most WAR of any second baseman in the history of the game and the only one in the top ten not in the Hall of Fame.

I was devastated when the O's lost Grich. :mad:

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No doubt. When the guy with a digital taco as his picture has to point that out, it got real..real quick! lol

How about that Bobby Grich though?

True story. When I was living in NYC and the Angels were in town, I saw him come out of a neighbor's apartment at 2 a.m. This may tie in with Drungo and OFFNY.

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I can't think of a player whose WAR totals are so far out of line with his conventional stats. Grich never batted over .278 in a full season with us, never had more than 19 homers, had only one season over 60 RBI, and never scored 100 runs.

Look at the offensive statistics of second basemen in that era.

Especially the power numbers.

Sent from my XT1080 using Tapatalk

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