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What if Cal took steroids?


murrayfan420

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If Cal used steroids - the voters would have to completely change the way they look at putting players in the hall of fame. If Cal did it, McGuire, Sosa, Palmeiro, and maybe even Canseco should be in the hall. It would change the way we all look at baseball because it would go from the thinking that only a certain few did it to a feeling that it was a part of the game.

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I had this very discussion with someone yesterday. Their argument was that Cal's streak is suspect to being aided by steroid use because he played every game for 16 years. I simply told him Cal was able to play everyday b/c of his passion and love for the game, taking care of himself, and not being a wuss when he had a minor injury.

Then I asked him if he thinks Gehrig had some help, seeing as how he did the same thing, to which he responded that they played in different eras.

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What evidence suggests steroid use was widespread before the McGwire/Sosa splurge starting in about 1998?

I know a couple of accusations (Bagwell, Canseco), but nothing I've heard suggests it was widespread prior to, say, 1995.

[EDIT: For the record, I raise this point because I see absolutely no evidence that Cal ever took steroids. Any discussion of this possibility is pure conjecture...I just wanted to make that point.]

I don't have the time right now at work to look up any sources for my 1990-2005 claim, so I'll just admit that I used that time frame soley on things I've read from Canseco and others.

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I would be shocked and disappointed. I grew up idolizing the guy. I collected his baseball cards, got any Ripken membrobilla that I could get, and have his autograph that I got in 07 when he was promoting "Get in the Game." I remember always checking the box scores to see how he did too. I for one don't believe that he did use steroids though because he did as said decline, his father's values and how important they are to him seems to be another reason, and it seems that most of the guys his age that did had monster years when they were supposed to be declining. I believe Bonds was 37 the year he hit 73 home runs. Cal was 37 in 97 and I believe hit around 270 with 14 home runs with 75 or so RBIs. Not sure about the OPS but with that 270 average and relatively weak power I am sure it wasn't too great. Then again I was surprised when Palmeiro was revealed and A-Rod too so nothing would really surprise me anymore. I would be disappointed as said.

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It is a sad, sad day when heroes like Cal Ripken are questioned simply because of guilt by association.

While I am sickened by the question, it is not out-of-bounds. Looking back at Ripken's career, here's what we do know:

1. He maintained relatively the same weight over the course of his career. Pretty sure he kept same weight from age 25 to his retirement.

2. His best friend (Brady Anderson) has long been a suspected poster child of steriods and other performance enhancers.

3. The majority of Ripken's career occurred before designer steriods ("cream", "clear", and HGH) became proliferated by labs like BALCO, etc. (Someone with a better understanding of history can correct me here, but I always considered the newer, designer steriods and performance enhancers to be recovery agents moreso than mass-building steriods whereas the earlier steriod substances were more muscle builders. See Canseco, McGwire, etc.)

4. Cal did become injured late in his career. One could make the presumption that if he had been using performance enhancers, well then he would not have gotten hurt.

5. Amphetamines and "greenies" were of rampant usage in baseball for a long time. I suspect that most players have tried them, including Cal. However, is this any different than chugging some Red Bull or 5-hr energy, the stimulants of today? I'm glad baseball banned greenies, but to me they are not equivalent to muscle recovery or muscle enhancing drugs of today like HGH, testosterone, designer steriods, etc.

6. Cal was never concerned with numbers and statistics other than playing everyday. You could argue that uncertainty surrounding steriods effects would cause him to stay away for fear of jeopardizing the streak.

Baseball leadership has certainly gotten a better handle on drug testing than before. However, the Mitchell report did not close the past. Baseball leadership's (Fehr, Selig, etc.) failure to address the past has only prompted the press and media to go digging. My hope is that an ambassador will come forward of the non-Canseco variety (McGwire, maybe?) who will not fear ostricization and will speak the truth about drugs in baseball. (And why hasn't Selig appointed a designated position for a chief counsel or officer role of oversight for baseball's drug administration?)

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I know it sounds awful... but at this point, I'd probably just shrug. Apologize to me honestly and be detailed and sincere about it, and I'm moving on pretty quickly.

I also agree with this. I am SO done with the steroid scandal its not even funny. Truth is, the testing was done after Cal retired, so unless he admits something there is no chance we would ever know if he did take anything.

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I know it sounds awful... but at this point, I'd probably just shrug. Apologize to me honestly and be detailed and sincere about it, and I'm moving on pretty quickly.

I'm in the same basic boat. At this point, nothing would surprise me. Disappoint me, perhaps, but not surprise.

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If I was told Cal used steroids, and then asked am I surprised, I would reply, "If I woke up tomorrow with my head sewn to the carpet, I would be no more surprised than I am right now."

Rep for the Christmas Vacation reference. :D

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I also agree with this. I am SO done with the steroid scandal its not even funny. Truth is, the testing was done after Cal retired, so unless he admits something there is no chance we would ever know if he did take anything.

Actually at this point, pretty much the only way we find out is if he ADMITS to it on his own volition. And if he did that, I have to say that I'd have more respect for him for just being man enough to say, "Yeah, I did it too."

The only honorable way about this is to just come clean on your own, before the spotlight's cast on you, and apologize sincerely.

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I had this very discussion with someone yesterday. Their argument was that Cal's streak is suspect to being aided by steroid use because he played every game for 16 years. I simply told him Cal was able to play everyday b/c of his passion and love for the game, taking care of himself, and not being a wuss when he had a minor injury.

Then I asked him if he thinks Gehrig had some help, seeing as how he did the same thing, to which he responded that they played in different eras.

I am no expert but wouldn't using steroids increase the chance of being injured? And as for the different eras I would have to say that's a lot of bs if you consider that players today are much more physically fit than those in Gehrig's and furthermore that pitchers don't throw at guys as much as they did in Gehrig's time/\.

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Like others said, I would be pretty disappointed. I grew up an O's fan because of Cal, and I played baseball because of Cal. I collected his cards and other memorialbilia and followed his career very closely from the time I became a fan to the time he retired.

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