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What if Cal took steroids?


murrayfan420

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Now obviously I’m not saying he did or even implying anyone should THINK he did. But all the evidence suggests that from 1990-2005 steroids were a very prominent part of baseball.

How would you view him if it came out he took steroids? I personally think it would be the absolute worst thing to happen to baseball. Cal is one of the most revered players in the history of MLB, if he ever got dirtied I don’t know what would happen.

Before anyone kills me for bringing this up, ask yourself if you would be shocked finding out ANYONE took steroids during that era. At this point, I would believe anything.

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Now obviously I’m not saying he did or even implying anyone should THINK he did. But all the evidence suggests that from 1990-2005 steroids were a very prominent part of baseball.

How would you view him if it came out he took steroids? I personally think it would be the absolute worst thing to happen to baseball. Cal is one of the most revered players in the history of MLB, if he ever got dirtied I don’t know what would happen.

Before anyone kills me for bringing this up, ask yourself if you would be shocked finding out ANYONE took steroids during that era. At this point, I would believe anything.

He didn't.

But if he did, you can assume that everyone, and I mean everyone, did.

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Well, I personally don’t think he did either.. but we don’t know for sure. That is why this whole era is tainted.

The thought did enter my mind while watching A-Roid squirm around during the Gammons interview. AROD and Cal were said to be pretty close. Let's just hope Cal wasn't as stupid as A-ROID. :pray::pray:

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Well, I personally don’t think he did either.. but we don’t know for sure. That is why this whole era is tainted.

No, we don't know for sure. But we can look at the data, and draw a logical conclusion.

Looking at Cal's career progression, its obvious his numbers tailed off in a normal aging fashion.

His power numbers at the peak of his career, suggest he must have been a 6' 4", 220 pound man... which he was.

We also have the benefit to have been witness to his character, his father's character, and his brother's character. Cal is unique to us fans, from this perspective. All of which say, Cal would not have taken a short cut in his career or life.

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I would be saddened beyond belief. Cal's pretty much the poster boy for doing things the right way, and if he was tainted it would really be a crushing blow.

I'd say the odds that he took steroids are very low, but I would never rule it out as to any player who played in any portion of the era when steroids were generally available.

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But all the evidence suggests that from 1990-2005 steroids were a very prominent part of baseball.

What evidence suggests steroid use was widespread before the McGwire/Sosa splurge starting in about 1998?

I know a couple of accusations (Bagwell, Canseco), but nothing I've heard suggests it was widespread prior to, say, 1995.

[EDIT: For the record, I raise this point because I see absolutely no evidence that Cal ever took steroids. Any discussion of this possibility is pure conjecture...I just wanted to make that point.]

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The thought did enter my mind while watching A-Roid squirm around during the Gammons interview.
You have to believe that there are 103 other current and former baseball players squirming right now. These players who tested positive for PEDs in 2003 are just waiting for the bell to toll for them.

If I were one of the players who tested positive in 2003, I would consider going public now with that information. The information is bound to come out, and it would be a load off of my shoulders to get the revelation out now that I had tested positive in 2003 versus just waiting for the eventual release of the names.

If I was a player who played in 2003 who didn't test positive for PEDs, I'd want the list out right away. Everyone who played major league baseball in 2003 has question marks now concerning PED use.

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Well, he was able to play everyday...Takes a lot to be able to bounce back everyday.

Also, as he got older and he started to show his age, that happened in the early part of the steroid era...A player like him is always used to being the best and when you start to decline, then perhaps you do something to help yourself.

That being said, it would be shocking if he did it, if for no other reason than because of his father.

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