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Blocking the plate.


bpilktree

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And/or you could use the commit line as a warning and guide to the baserunner: If you're here and the ball's already in the catcher's glove, you're out. No collisions, no spending 10 minutes with the replay arguing he was blocking the plate before the ball arrived... just a simple you're automatically out if you haven't gotten to the mark and the catcher has the ball.

How about installing a traffic light behind home plate for the runners (and catchers).

1. Red. You're out. Runner must stopd and proceed to dugout.

2. Yellow. Runner must reduce to safe speed, proceed with caution and slide at own risk.

3. Green. Balls to the wall and proceed with full slide. Catcher must yield right of way.

Umpires may assign citations under a point system to penalize and identify repeat offenders.

After accumulating years of data we can utilize civil engineers to analyze accidents and traffic flow patterns to improve efficiency.

Maybe the catcher can be attached to a harness that will pull and suspend him in mid-air above home plate after catching the ball so as to be able to effect a safe tag without endangering the runner.

Maybe inflatable air bags for the catchers and base runners that will trigger on close proximity or at the instant of collision. They blow up like those fake sumo wrestlers. That would be cool.

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How about installing a traffic light behind home plate for the runners (and catchers).

1. Red. You're out. Runner must yield and proceed to dugout.

2. Yellow. Runner must reduce to safe speed, proceed with caution and slide at own own risk.

3. Green. Balls to the wall and proceed with full slide. Catcher must yield right of way.

Umpires may assign citations under a point system to penalize and identify repeat offenders.

After accumulating years of data we can utilize civil engineers to analyze accidents and traffic flow patterns to improve efficiency.

RWI's as well, right ???

A drunk baserunner can be very dangerous to all of those around him.

Mickey Mantle probably would gotten a lot of those in his prime.

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RWI's as well, right ???

A drunk baserunner can be very dangerous to all of those around him.

Mickey Mantle probably would gotten a lot of those in his prime.

Absoloutely. We could even issue ROR violations (Running on Roids). Sky is the limit here really. We just need more control and more rules to fix these out of control base runners.

Here's at thought: MABB (Mother Against Bad Baserunners).

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