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#19 Prospect - SS Greg Miclat


Tony-OH

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You have to like a guy with plate discipline, speed, and defense at shortstop to still be at #19. He could very easily be in the top ten next year...

http://www.orioleshangout.com/plus/plusarticle.asp?ID=1805

Tony (and Stotle and whoever else wants to chime in), without tipping your cap too much on where we might find Angle, can you explain a little about what makes Miclat a better prospect? I'm sensing that you have a decent gap between the two.

Obviously, one's a SS and the other is a CF, but there are also some obvious similarities.

Oh, and this was the first time that I blatantly went with 'my guy' over trying to determine who you'd pick. I went with Butler and figured I'd be wrong. I wish I'd voted for Wilfrido; poor guy got zero votes.

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Tony (and Stotle and whoever else wants to chime in), without tipping your cap too much on where we might find Angle, can you explain a little about what makes Miclat a better prospect? I'm sensing that you have a decent gap between the two.

Obviously, one's a SS and the other is a CF, but there are also some obvious similarities.

Oh, and I this was the first time that I blatantly went with 'my guy' over trying to determine who you'd pick. I went with Butler and figured I'd be wrong. I wish I'd voted for Wilfrido; poor guy got zero votes.

Everyone I talked too just raved about Miclat and they believe he'll hit for more pop in the minors then he did in college because of the approach they teach at Virginia.

I've never seen him so this pick is based purely off of the glowing reports I got. I guess we'll see, but he's got the potential to be a starting SS in a Pedroia-type mold.

As for him versus Angle, I'd say his bat projects a little better than Angle overall, but they really are not that dis-similar as an offensive player.

This is one that we'll know a lot more about this time next year.

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Everyone I talked too just raved about Miclat and they believe he'll hit for more pop in the minors then he did in college because of the approach they teach at Virginia.

I've never seen him so this pick is based purely off of the glowing reports I got. I guess we'll see, but he's got the potential to be a starting SS in a Pedroia-type mold.

As for him versus Angle, I'd say his bat projects a little better than Angle overall, but they really are not that dis-similar as an offensive player.

This is one that we'll know a lot more about this time next year.

I try not to take these scouting reports too literally, but I am a bit confused about the Pedroia comparison. In the scouting report, you described him as a Juan Pierre slap hitter who could develop gap power. But Pedroia is significantly better than that. Pedroia hit 17 hr and slugged .493 this year, which was his age 24 season and 2nd full season in the bigs.

So do you really think Miclat has Pedroia type ability (ceiling) and/or do we have different opinions about Pedroia?

Because the scouting report makes me think more along the lines of a David Eckstein.

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I try not to take these scouting reports too literally, but I am a bit confused about the Pedroia comparison. In the scouting report, you described him as a Juan Pierre slap hitter who could develop gap power. But Pedroia is significantly better than that. Pedroia hit 17 hr and slugged .493 this year, which was his age 24 season and 2nd full season in the bigs.

So do you really think Miclat has Pedroia type ability (ceiling) and/or do we have different opinions about Pedroia?

Because the scouting report makes me think more along the lines of a David Eckstein.

Not to answer for Tony, but I see a Pedroia-type skill set as well. Miclat has an advanced command of the strikezone and is very difficult to strikeout. He has the ability to consistently square-up on the ball due to his hand-eye coordination (which is also part of the reason he's such a tough strikeout).

McNulty is a good person to speak to about this (and could confirm better than I can) but I believe Tony is right on with regards to Miclat's "slap" approach being taught at UVA. My understanding is he was coached to his ability to make contact and run quickly.

Though he's rather short, he's strong. While we haven't seen the power manifest itself yet, it's easy to see his compact swing and quick wrists put him in the low-double digit HR range. It may be a case of slightly more doubles and slightly fewer HRs, but I think a Pedroia-esque ceiling is about right (with a stronger defensive arm, comparable hands and slightly better range -- enough to stay at SS).

ANyway, that's my take.

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Tony (and Stotle and whoever else wants to chime in), without tipping your cap too much on where we might find Angle, can you explain a little about what makes Miclat a better prospect? I'm sensing that you have a decent gap between the two.

Obviously, one's a SS and the other is a CF, but there are also some obvious similarities.

Oh, and this was the first time that I blatantly went with 'my guy' over trying to determine who you'd pick. I went with Butler and figured I'd be wrong. I wish I'd voted for Wilfrido; poor guy got zero votes.

I agree with what Tony wrote. I think there is more potential pop and a better tendency to square-up on pitches. I agree they are similar, though I think Miclat could be more readily turned into a fringe-average power guy (maybe a 40/45). Tony, please correct me if you've heard differently -- I'm going purely on UVA-years scouting.

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McNulty is a good person to speak to about this (and could confirm better than I can) but I believe Tony is right on with regards to Miclat's "slap" approach being taught at UVA. My understanding is he was coached to his ability to make contact and run quickly.

This is correct. UVA's style of play (even when they had more power with Sean Doolittle and others including Ryan Zimmerman) has always been geared around getting on base and using speed. They play small ball (and do it very well).

I've never been to their ballpark, but I've read its an extreme pitchers park (by college standards), so what the coaching staff is doing is smart in the sense that they are playing to their strengths.

I'm not skilled enough to be able to say that he will be Pedroia minus the power if he hits his ceiling. Its more in the style of play then anything else that this comparison is rooted. I saw him play about a dozen times in Jacksonville's AA ballpark, which you can only hit a ball out if its pulled down either line (the centerfield dimensions are ridiculous, and the only guy I've ever seen hit one out is Buster Posey last year...and that includes the AA Southern League), and I do believe (if my memory serves correctly) Miclat had a game against NC State as a freshman where he hit two long doubles...both to left center (meaning, he pulled them). I think the pitcher was Andrew Brackman...but my memory is failing me here, and the box score on the ACC's website is a dead link.

Brackman, you'll recall, was a first round overslot draft by the Yanks in 07.

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Not to answer for Tony, but I see a Pedroia-type skill set as well. Miclat has an advanced command of the strikezone and is very difficult to strikeout. He has the ability to consistently square-up on the ball due to his hand-eye coordination (which is also part of the reason he's such a tough strikeout).

I agree on most of the scouting report on Miclat though I still really question his power potential, but I can't see the Pedroia comparisons besides each players' physical features, maybe their intellect for the game, their scrappiness, and their plate discipline.

Pedroia has one of the most efficient swings in baseball. His swing is violent and aggressive, but the bat is short and quick through the zone and his hand-eye coordination allows him to consistently square up on the ball.

Pedroia's numbers dating back to college display this ability:

BA - .347, .404, .393

ISO - .085, .175 and .213

BB:K - 24:19, 36:13, 48:15

Miclat hit:

BA - .316, .376, .320

ISO - .070, .112, .062

BB:K - 18:44, 39:15, 39:26

Pedroia was a much better offensive prospect than Miclat. I'll buy UVA's approach kept Miclat from showing much power, but even as a slap hitter, I would of liked to see him hit for a higher batting average than he did while at UVA.

I would say he is much more comparable to Matt Angle if you look at the size, the tools, and the numbers.

If you're looking for an MLB comp., Eckstein does fit the description and probably represents Miclat's upside, IMO. Pedroia could be MVP of the league this year and his OPS is still only .869 and that is with a swing that is extremely efficient, and some of the best hand-eye coordination in the league. He's getting every last bit of talent out of his body. Miclat can't touch that and if he does, I will humbly admit I'm wrong and enjoy a top-5 player at the postion for the next 10 years.

He's better than Fahey, he should be better than Davis, but I see him as more of a utility guy if he reaches the majors with an upside of the Eckstein or even Jason Bartlett type.

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I agree on most of the scouting report on Miclat though I still really question his power potential, but I can't see the Pedroia comparisons besides each players' physical features, maybe their intellect for the game, their scrappiness, and their plate discipline.

Pedroia has one of the most efficient swings in baseball. His swing is violent and aggressive, but the bat is short and quick through the zone and his hand-eye coordination allows him to consistently square up on the ball.

Pedroia's numbers dating back to college display this ability:

BA - .347, .404, .393

ISO - .085, .175 and .213

BB:K - 24:19, 36:13, 48:15

Miclat hit:

BA - .316, .376, .320

ISO - .070, .112, .062

BB:K - 18:44, 39:15, 39:26

Pedroia was a much better offensive prospect than Miclat. I'll buy UVA's approach kept Miclat from showing much power, but even as a slap hitter, I would of liked to see him hit for a higher batting average than he did while at UVA.

I would say he is much more comparable to Matt Angle if you look at the size, the tools, and the numbers.

If you're looking for an MLB comp., Eckstein does fit the description and probably represents Miclat's upside, IMO. Pedroia could be MVP of the league this year and his OPS is still only .869 and that is with a swing that is extremely efficient, and some of the best hand-eye coordination in the league. He's getting every last bit of talent out of his body. Miclat can't touch that and if he does, I will humbly admit I'm wrong and enjoy a top-5 player at the postion for the next 10 years.

He's better than Fahey, he should be better than Davis, but I see him as more of a utility guy if he reaches the majors with an upside of the Eckstein or even Jason Bartlett type.

Well, to be fair his junior stats are worth basically nothing, analytically, since he had greatly reduced bat speed due to his shoulder. Miclat's a tough case because he had a very strong sophomore year and we never got to see if he'd make that classic soph-->junior breakout.

I fully agree with you that he isn't Pedroia. A player as talented as Pedroia is unique and unlikely to have many players with identical talents. However (and this isn't necessarily a key point) Pedroia is outsdistancing his projections in spectacular fashion. It would be foolish for me to say "Pedroia has exceeded expectations so Miclat likely can". But I think his skill set (when healthy) could translate to a solid everyday SS -- not an elite offensive player.

Pedroia with less pop, but the same hand-eye, strikezone command, ability to square-up and a slightly better defender is a reasonable ceiling, in my opinion. Noting, of course, that is a best-case scenario.

As always, good posts NoVaO.

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Though he's rather short, he's strong. While we haven't seen the power manifest itself yet, it's easy to see his compact swing and quick wrists put him in the low-double digit HR range. It may be a case of slightly more doubles and slightly fewer HRs, but I think a Pedroia-esque ceiling is about right (with a stronger defensive arm, comparable hands and slightly better range -- enough to stay at SS).

ANyway, that's my take.

Pedroia is on his way to being arguably the best young player in baseball - an MVP candidate. So, if I believed Miclat had a similar ceiling - except with better defensive ability - I'd rate him as the O's 2nd or 3rd prospect. Is that a fair conclusion?

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I like this choice at no. 19. My thoughts on Miclat are set out in another recent thread and can be found here: http://forum.orioleshangout.com/forums/showthread.php?t=71413

All this talk about whether Miclat has the power potential of Dustin Pedroia is nice, but I think any discussion of a shortstop prospect should start with whether he can handle that position defensively at the major league level. The indications are that Miclat not only can handle it, but could even be an above average major league shortstop defensively. Assuming that projection is accurate, frankly I am just not that concerned with whether Miclat is going to hit with power in the majors.

What does concern me is whether Miclat can get on base and use his speed. Let's say he can get to the point where he looks like the 2003-04 version of BRob offensively -- .270/.340/.370 with 25 stolen bases. That was decent enough at 2B, but give me that package in an above average defensive shortstop and I will very gladly take it.

Sticking with the BRob analogy for a minute, he was drafted in 1999, had significant stints in Baltimore in 2001 and 2002, and finally settled in as the starting 2B in 2003. He missed a lot of the 2000 season with injuries. So I'd like to think that with good health, Miclat might be ready to get his feet wet in 2010, and become the starting SS in 2011.

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Pedroia is on his way to being arguably the best young player in baseball - an MVP candidate. So, if I believed Miclat had a similar ceiling - except with better defensive ability - I'd rate him as the O's 2nd or 3rd prospect. Is that a fair conclusion?

I think I'm reading Stotle's and Tony's posts a little differently than some others. I think there's a big difference in saying, "he has a Pedroia-esque" skill set and, "he could be the next Pedroia". The former is trying to describe what type of player he is. The latter is putting unrealistic expectations on the 5th round draft pick and OH #19 Oriole prospect (unless Pedroia comes WAY back to Earth).

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I think I'm reading Stotle's and Tony's posts a little differently than some others. I think there's a big difference in saying, "he has a Pedroia-esque" skill set and, "he could be the next Pedroia". The former is trying to describe what type of player he is. The latter is putting unrealistic expectations on the 5th round draft pick and OH #19 Oriole prospect (unless Pedroia comes WAY back to Earth).

This is right on. I'm not be any means saying he's the next Pedroia. He would really need to exceed expectations for that to happen and he doesn't have the college stats to back that up either.

What I meant by Pedroia-esque skill set is the fact he's going to get on base, work pitchers, hit some doubles, and generally be a tough out. I don't think he'll ever hit for the power that Pedroia does, but I can see him hitting a fair amount of doubles if the reports are accurate.

He's #19 for a reason and that's because there are still a lot of unknowns with how he's going to do against upper level professional pitching and how his shoulder will hold up.

It's nice to have a guy like this on the lower portion of the top 20 but if I really thought he was the next Pedroia I think I might have him a little higher.

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