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Fox: GM Diversity


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<blockquote class="twitter-tweet" lang="en"><p lang="en" dir="ltr">With GM openings, <a href="https://twitter.com/MLB">@MLB</a> can increase number of minorities in leadership positions. My column: <a href="http://t.co/WphjFxLQEm">http://t.co/WphjFxLQEm</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/FOXSports">@FOXSports</a> <a href="https://twitter.com/FS1">@FS1</a></p>— Jon Morosi (@jonmorosi) <a href="

">September 6, 2015</a></blockquote>

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"Personally, I am pleased with the focus that has been put on the issue," Tampa Bay Rays principal owner Stuart Sternberg, who chairs MLB's Diversity and Inclusion Committee, told FOX Sports.

The issue of minority hiring in baseball gained attention earlier this year, when the Marlins, Brewers and Padres promoted internal candidates, who are white, to fill major-league managerial vacancies.

According to Dr. Richard Lapchick, primary author of the Racial and Gender Report Card, white players accounted for 58.8 percent of MLB roster spots at the beginning of this season. By comparison, 93.3 percent of managers (28 of 30) are white; Seattle's Lloyd McClendon and Atlanta's Fredi Gonzalez are the only minority managers.

The census of top front-office positions is less straightforward; a growing number of teams have a "president of baseball operations" and "general manager," making it difficult to discern which person has the most proximate authority over baseball decisions.

Six minorities hold baseball operations positions at the GM level or above: Marlins president of baseball operations Michael Hill, Diamondbacks general manager Dave Stewart, Tigers general manager Al Avila, Dodgers general manager Farhan Zaidi, Phillies general manager Ruben Amaro Jr. and White Sox executive vice president Ken Williams.

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Given the amount of responsibility a GM handles I'd never make diversity for its own sake a consideration in hiring a candidate. So I'm not really sure what the point is of having a GM of a certain skin color, gender, whatever.

Nor do I. But I do believe that a proactive attempt to interview qualified candidates of any race, religion or sex is required to keep the already old boys club from becoming more so.

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Given the amount of responsibility a GM handles I'd never make diversity for its own sake a consideration in hiring a candidate. So I'm not really sure what the point is of having a GM of a certain skin color, gender, whatever.

I think it should be the best qualified. If its a minority then by all means they

should get the job. IMO

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Nor do I. But I do believe that a proactive attempt to interview qualified candidates of any race, religion or sex is required to keep the already old boys club from becoming more so.

I think it should be a proactive attempt to interview the most qualified candidates. If my club is interviewing people because they're white males and not baseball savants I'd be pissed.

I think it should be the best qualified. If its a minority then by all means they

should get the job. IMO

Exactly.

Maybe this post will be relevant to the team after Peter lets DD go

White male Brady Anderson should be this team's next GM regardless of interviewees. Just saying. He's earned it and he seems the most qualified and he's an Oriole. Orange and black are the most important colors.

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I think it should be a proactive attempt to interview the most qualified candidates. If my club is interviewing people because they're white males and not baseball savants I'd be pissed.

White male Brady Anderson should be this team's next GM regardless of interviewees. Just saying. He's earned it and he seems the most qualified and he's an Oriole. Orange and black are the most important colors.

Or, vice versa. If the team is interviewing people based on some authoritarian rule it created a la affirmative action and Brady is left out of the process because of it I'd be pissed.

Again, the most qualified. There should be by no means exclusions to qualified individuals based on race or gender. That's what they should promote.

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