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Reynolds: one error since July 4th


Frobby

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Has Reynolds settled down defensively? He had 20 errors as of July 4th (80 games played), and now only one error in the last 24 games he's played.

I hope I haven't just jinxed him.

I always pencil him in at 3B, when looking to the future. He is an average 3B'man, in my estimation, that simply went through a very rough defensive slump, but has had his footwork/mechanics resolved. He will be fine.

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Has Reynolds settled down defensively? He had 20 errors as of July 4th (80 games played), and now only one error in the last 24 games he's played.

I hope I haven't just jinxed him.

The other day Jones throws an absolutely perfect one-bouncer to him from center field to get the runner coming to third, and Reynolds muffed it. He's still making mistakes, just not always scored as errors. He's not a good third baseman.

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Since we're discussing meaningless stats, he also has 0 Quality Starts since July 4th?

So now that he's gone nearly a month without making an error, after working hard on resolving his footwork and mechanical issues, that is somehow "meaningless"?

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So now that he's gone nearly a month without making an error, after working hard on resolving his footwork and mechanical issues, that is somehow "meaningless"?

Him working hard to resolve his footwork and mechanical issues is good. Him not having an error means nothing, because errors are a ridiculous measure of anything. May as well count how many times he has passed wind out there.

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Since we're discussing meaningless stats, he also has 0 Quality Starts since July 4th?

I am sorry, but it's idiotic to say that errors are "meaningless." They are quite meaningful. Obviously they are not the only component of defense, but who said that they were?

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Him working hard to resolve his footwork and mechanical issues is good. Him not having an error means nothing, because errors are a ridiculous measure of anything. May as well count how many times he has passed wind out there.

Why are errors meaningless? I'm simply baffled in trying to figure out what you mean.

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Well, every study of defensive value has showed virtually no correlation between errors and defensive value (EDIT: to my knowledge). They are a stat that penalizes people for getting to balls that other players do not, and rewards players for not attempting to get to balls that are difficult to play. They suffer from so many more issues than this, (such as subjectivity). Even if they were a good metric, analyzing them over such a short time period and drawing any conclusion would be ludicrous. Even "good" defensive measurements can't be trusted for an entire years worth of data.

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Well, every study of defensive value has showed virtually no correlation between errors and defensive value (EDIT: to my knowledge). They are a stat that penalizes people for getting to balls that other players do not, and rewards players for not attempting to get to balls that are difficult to play. They suffer from so many more issues than this, (such as subjectivity). Even if they were a good metric, analyzing them over such a short time period and drawing any conclusion would be ludicrous. Even "good" defensive measurements can't be trusted for an entire years worth of data.

I believe there is 'some' truth in that, but it holds more water with positions like SS, where range plays a more vital role, than the quick-twitch position of 3B. Making terrible throws to 1B when it would have been a normal easy play IS indicative of poor skill. He seems to have resolved it, but it wasn't meaningless that he had these issues. And you are very much on topic, in my view.

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Well, every study of defensive value has showed virtually no correlation between errors and defensive value. They are a stat that penalizes people for getting to balls that other players do not, and rewards players for not attempting to get to balls that are difficult to play. They suffer from so many more issues than this. Even if they were a good metric, analyzing them over such a short time period and drawing any conclusion would be ludicrous. Even "good" defensive measurements can't be trusted for an entire years worth of data.

If your point is that range is at least as important as errors, I can easily get on board with that. I just think you go way too far when you say errors are meaningless. Tell that to the pitchers and see what they say. As to your point about analyzing them over a short time, it depends what you are trying to say. I'd agree that how many errors you make in a small sample size is not necessarily a good measure of your defensive ability. But that's not what we are talking about here -- we are talking about results. It is my observation that defense can be quite streaky -- a player makes a few errors, it gets in his head, and that leads to more errors. Similarly, when a player gets into a period where he is fielding solidly, he gets more confident, and that can lead to a prolonged period of relatively error-free play. Reynolds was in a very bad slump defensively for a good chunk of the first half of the season, and it's nice to see him playing better now. That is all I am really trying to say.

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I believe there is 'some' truth in that, but it holds more water with positions like SS, where range plays a more vital role, than the quick-twitch position of 3B. Making terrible throws to 1B when it would have been a normal easy play IS indicative of poor skill. He seems to have resolved it, but it wasn't meaningless that he had these issues. And you are very much on topic, in my view.

Adrian Beltre made more errors than Mark Reynolds last year. Beltre is an insanely good 3B (I believe he is the best in the majors, and one of the best defenders in the majors), so I don't agree with your claim.

I don't necessarily disagree with your statement that "Making terrible throws to 1B when it would have been a normal easy play IS indicative of poor skill", but the problem is we are not talking about only throwing errors where there was plenty of time...we are talking about errors.

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