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Pedro Florimon - who'd have thought?


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For several years, whenever someone needed to come of the Orioles 40-man roster someone who say 'How about Florimon, why is he still on there?'. Finally, in late 2011, the Orioles waived him. Now I know he was not a good hitter at all, but what I did not know was that he was this good of a defender.

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/minnesota-twins-pedro-florimon-al-best-defensive-shortstop-150700554.html

As the article points out, Florimon's defensive rWAR is behind only Machado's this season. He also ranks quite high in a number of other defensive metrics.

I certainly am quite happy with the left side of our infield consisting of Machado and Hardy. No, I would not want Florimon to replace either. I'm just surprised that he's done so well, and if a team like Minnesota saw potential in him why did we give up on him and get nothing in return? Again, I realize he is terrible with the bat. Kudos to Florimon. I sure never saw this coming.

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For several years, whenever someone needed to come of the Orioles 40-man roster someone who say 'How about Florimon, why is he still on there?'. Finally, in late 2011, the Orioles waived him. Now I know he was not a good hitter at all, but what I did not know was that he was this good of a defender.

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/minnesota-twins-pedro-florimon-al-best-defensive-shortstop-150700554.html

As the article points out, Florimon's defensive rWAR is behind only Machado's this season. He also ranks quite high in a number of other defensive metrics.

I certainly am quite happy with the left side of our infield consisting of Machado and Hardy. No, I would not want Florimon to replace either. I'm just surprised that he's done so well, and if a team like Minnesota saw potential in him why did we give up on him and get nothing in return? Again, I realize he is terrible with the bat. Kudos to Florimon. I sure never saw this coming.

This is the same team that gave up on gold-glover JJ Hardy, so...

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Florimon does look pretty good out there defensively. The Twins have an interesting team with Floriman, Hicks, and Dozier up the middle. Stellar defense and very little offense. Might not be that bad but nobody else (other than Mauer) is hitting very well.

The fact that we have quite a few ex-Orioles doing fairly well for other teams (but not good enough to play for us) is a nice sign of progress.

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For several years, whenever someone needed to come of the Orioles 40-man roster someone who say 'How about Florimon, why is he still on there?'. Finally, in late 2011, the Orioles waived him. Now I know he was not a good hitter at all, but what I did not know was that he was this good of a defender.

http://sports.yahoo.com/news/minnesota-twins-pedro-florimon-al-best-defensive-shortstop-150700554.html

As the article points out, Florimon's defensive rWAR is behind only Machado's this season. He also ranks quite high in a number of other defensive metrics.

I certainly am quite happy with the left side of our infield consisting of Machado and Hardy. No, I would not want Florimon to replace either. I'm just surprised that he's done so well, and if a team like Minnesota saw potential in him why did we give up on him and get nothing in return? Again, I realize he is terrible with the bat. Kudos to Florimon. I sure never saw this coming.

And as you know, I think defensive metrics are unreliable.

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Florimon does look pretty good out there defensively. The Twins have an interesting team with Floriman, Hicks, and Dozier up the middle. Stellar defense and very little offense. Might not be that bad but nobody else (other than Mauer) is hitting very well.

The fact that we have quite a few ex-Orioles doing fairly well for other teams (but not good enough to play for us) is a nice sign of progress.

That is such a great post. I remember the day when we had to rely on Luis Hernandez and Cesar Izturis.

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That is such a great post. I remember the day when we had to rely on Luis Hernandez and Cesar Izturis.

I do. I remember Brandon Fahey playing corner OF, Freddie Bynum and Alex Cintron playing SS, Ty Wigginton being our AS rep and a host of other nightmares that I really don't want to think about.

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That is such a great post. I remember the day when we had to rely on Luis Hernandez and Cesar Izturis.

And Freddie Bynum, Alex Cintron, Juan Castro, Brandon Fahey, Julio Lugo, and (reaching back, but it's still clear as day to me) Luis Lopez.

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I do. I remember Brandon Fahey playing corner OF, Freddie Bynum and Alex Cintron playing SS, Ty Wigginton being our AS rep and a host of other nightmares that I really don't want to think about.

Ty Wigginton was raking like a beast. I say resign him for DH.

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After the 2009 season, we wrote:

Notes - This 22-year old shortstop was easily the comeback player of the year after putting up his best season in three years. In fact, if there was a Lazarus award for coming back from prospect death, Florimon would be the winner of that as well. Came into the season on the bubble for being released, but ended up as the organization's best shortstop prospect. Was named the Carolina League's starting shortstop after starting the season red hot batting .310 with a .973 OPS through the first two months of the season. The bubble seem to have burst a little in June and July when he hit just .201 (35-174), but he rallied to hit .312 with a .813 OPS in August before struggling in a seven game trial in Bowie (AA). Has always been a better hitter from the right-side of the plate than the left side and 2009 was no different as hit .251/.322/.361 against righties but .268/.319/.510 against lefties. Although his splits were not as severe as in year's past, he continues to be a much better hitter as a right-hander and some wonder if he could be a better hitter if he gave up switch hitting and focused on batting right-handed exclusively (.262/.349/.425/.774 vs .229/.299/.308/.607). Even though he showed pop for the first time in his career, he still needs to add strength and weight to his wiry frame. Defensively he is major league ready even though his 35 errors and .937 fielding percentage suggest he needs to concentrate more. Has very soft hands, outstanding range, and a major league shortstop arm, but seems to lose focus at times on the routine plays. Florimon's bat will determine his prospect future. If he can add some strength over the winter and can match or better his offense next year at Bowie, he could be in the Orioles plans by 2011.

After 2011:

Every time people want to bury this switch-hitter shortstop as a prospect he does things that remind people of his major league skill sets. Florimon's biggest issue has always been consistency and part of it seems to be a lack of concentration. He'll look like a legitimate major league shortstop one game and then the next look like a 1st year player. Behind Hardy and Andino, Florimon is the only other player in the upper level of the system who can play a major league shortstop defensively. Offensively, he'll flash some skills but he still has too much miss in his swing for a guy with limited power. Florimon has the classic signs of a person with attention deficit disorder and if the Orioles can ever get him to be consistent, he still could be useful to them.

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After the 2009 season, we wrote:

Notes - This 22-year old shortstop was easily the comeback player of the year after putting up his best season in three years. In fact, if there was a Lazarus award for coming back from prospect death, Florimon would be the winner of that as well. Came into the season on the bubble for being released, but ended up as the organization's best shortstop prospect. Was named the Carolina League's starting shortstop after starting the season red hot batting .310 with a .973 OPS through the first two months of the season. The bubble seem to have burst a little in June and July when he hit just .201 (35-174), but he rallied to hit .312 with a .813 OPS in August before struggling in a seven game trial in Bowie (AA). Has always been a better hitter from the right-side of the plate than the left side and 2009 was no different as hit .251/.322/.361 against righties but .268/.319/.510 against lefties. Although his splits were not as severe as in year's past, he continues to be a much better hitter as a right-hander and some wonder if he could be a better hitter if he gave up switch hitting and focused on batting right-handed exclusively (.262/.349/.425/.774 vs .229/.299/.308/.607). Even though he showed pop for the first time in his career, he still needs to add strength and weight to his wiry frame. Defensively he is major league ready even though his 35 errors and .937 fielding percentage suggest he needs to concentrate more. Has very soft hands, outstanding range, and a major league shortstop arm, but seems to lose focus at times on the routine plays. Florimon's bat will determine his prospect future. If he can add some strength over the winter and can match or better his offense next year at Bowie, he could be in the Orioles plans by 2011.

After 2011:

Every time people want to bury this switch-hitter shortstop as a prospect he does things that remind people of his major league skill sets. Florimon's biggest issue has always been consistency and part of it seems to be a lack of concentration. He'll look like a legitimate major league shortstop one game and then the next look like a 1st year player. Behind Hardy and Andino, Florimon is the only other player in the upper level of the system who can play a major league shortstop defensively. Offensively, he'll flash some skills but he still has too much miss in his swing for a guy with limited power. Florimon has the classic signs of a person with attention deficit disorder and if the Orioles can ever get him to be consistent, he still could be useful to them.

Does MLB allow players to get medicated with greenies for ADHD/ADD?

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And Freddie Bynum, Alex Cintron, Juan Castro, Brandon Fahey, Julio Lugo, and (reaching back, but it's still clear as day to me) Luis Lopez.

Don't forget that excellent free agent acquisition, corner outfielder Jay Payton. And all the guys we thought were going to be great ones like Gary Matthews Jr, Luis Matos, Larry Bigbie.

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