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Best Swing in Baseball?


RayFink1e

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Who do you think has the sweetest swing in the bigs?

I am going with

1. Joe Mauer

2. Griffey

3. Bonds when healthy

4. Arod

5. Chipper

I know I am missing alot. Just off the top of my head

Ichiro... A magnificently beautiful swing. :eek:

For a RH batter I'd put Pujols up there. For the most part it seems like lefties have an advantage when it comes to having a sweet swing.

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Griffy - by a long long margin

Ichiro/Iwamura - they have very similar swings and it is amazing how their set up leads to amazing contact. If I were teaching kids to hit I would want them to emulate this

Matt Holliday - One of better young power hitters

Is Jay Buhner still in the league? I realize he has retired but he always had a great swing.

Sheffield - I know its not sweet, and I know its jsut to mangle the ball, but I think there is something to it.

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Mike Piazza.

HAHAHAHA!

I used to always love Bigbie's swing to be quite honest...

Righty - Pujols

Lefty - Bonds or Junior - different but Junior will start to fade real hard in the next year - he won't be able to clear those slow hips and slow hands as he gets older - that swing is doomed for as old as he is getting...

All-time - Molitor

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HAHAHAHA!

I used to always love Bigbie's swing to be quite honest...

Righty - Pujols

Lefty - Bonds or Junior - different but Junior will start to fade real hard in the next year - he won't be able to clear those slow hips and slow hands as he gets older - that swing is doomed for as old as he is getting...

All-time - Molitor

What is so funny?

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Ichiro/Iwamura - they have very similar swings and it is amazing how their set up leads to amazing contact. If I were teaching kids to hit I would want them to emulate this

That's a pretty common approach in Japan. I love how a culture that was very isolated, at least in a baseball sense, for so long developed their own ways of doing things that work quite well but are very different from accepted practice here. Just goes to show that the accepted notion of what works and what doesn't isn't always true.

In today's US game there are many fewer odd stances and swings than there used to be. I think it's the culture of baseball, with all the money and the exposure fewer players and coaches are willing to accept strange approaches for fear of failure. I'm 100% sure that only 20 years ago you saw a much wider variety of stances and swings. I'm pretty sure Cal Ripken had more stances in his career than you're likely to see watching a whole major league season of hundreds of players today. You used to have Dan Ford with his back facing the pitcher. You'd have Brian Downing with his chest facing the pitcher. John Wockenfuss would stand with both feet on the back line of the box. Mike Fischlin used to get into this exaggerated crouch with the bat parallel to and about six inches off the ground. Rickey had a pretty extreme crouch. Yaz and Musial had bizarre stances with the bat held high over their heads. Brett and the other Lau devotees stood way back with an extreme weight shift. Joe Morgan had his elbow twitch.

Today if you see Tony Batista mimicking Downing you giggle behind his back. 95% of everyone has a balanced stance with minimal bat movement.

I don't know if it works any better, but it's sure less interesting.

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