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Dustin Pedroia Wins AL MVP


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The rational part of me is fine with this.

There wasn't a real dominant force in the league this year, and the vote does seem to be pretty well split between a few candidates. He did seem to be carrying the Red Sox for a while, and does have quality offensive numbers and the Gold Glove. I'm surprised Youkilis didn't get more votes, though, and split it a little more.

The irrational part of me, on the other hand...let's just leave it at :cussing:

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No, it's not smart, because that's not the way the voting system works. If Grant was thinking that way, he should have just written down one or two names so the ones he thought were just filler weren't given additional votes. Instead, he filled out all 10 and omitted Pedroia. You (generic "you") rank your top 10 choices. If you leave Dustin Pedroia out, you did not think he was in the top 10 of the AL, or you are vindictive because you don't like his big mouth or the B on his hat. Leaving him out for the first reason means you know nothing about evaluating baseball players. Leaving him out for the second reason means you are juvenile and petty. Neither one is becoming. Leaving him entirely off so he gets NO points is indeed making a statement: I don't like this guy, so I'm going to sabotage him. If you think he was THAT undeserving, then there is still something wrong with you, because he wasn't. Heck, Grant was just on WEEI and even he now seems to think he's stupid.

Edit: Sorry for the strong tone, for some reason this issue has me hot under the collar.

Yea, the system is actually pretty well designed. You're supposed to rank your candidates, and it allows the random writer to put Jacque Jones as his #8 or #10 guy on the ballot and it'll barely effect the overall outcome at all. And it gets to the right outcome more often than not (right defined as the player most voters think was at or near the top) because they rank candidates. It wasn't designed so that some doofus can completely omit the 2nd or 3rd (or even best) player in the league so his favorite guy can win.

But put 500 people in a room and there will be some dumb things happen, no matter how well the system is designed.

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Pedroia was a bad choice because his numbers were inflated by Fenway Park. All he did this year was become an expert in hitting lazy fly balls off the Monster and cruising into 2nd. During away games he was about as good as Mora or Roberts, which isn't terrible but it aint no MVP.

Didn't know his splits were that crazy.

Home = .344/.393/.519 .....911

Away = .309/.359/.468......827

Joe Mauer's

Home = .322/.418/.455....873

Away = .336/.407/.447....853

Did I mention that Mauer was a catcher?

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Sizemore had a slight advantage in OPS and VORP over Pedroia. He had 18 more steals, played a more important defensive position and played better defense at that position. Sizemore should have won instead of Pedroia.

Also, I hate Pedroia.

2B is both more difficult and more important than CF, although it's not hugely different in difficulty as both require a fair amount of specialized skill (although 2B is more based on learned skill and decision making while CF puts a higher premium on pure athleticism). Pedroia had 733 chances, Sizemore 386. There's plenty of good reason that players like BJ Upton who struggle defensively move from 2B to CF, not the other way around. I wouldn't have objected to Sizemore winning the MVP, but I do object to the constant crapping on second basemen that goes on.

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2B is both more difficult and more important than CF, although it's not hugely different in difficulty as both require a fair amount of specialized skill (although 2B is more based on learned skill and decision making while CF puts a higher premium on pure athleticism). Pedroia had 733 chances, Sizemore 386. There's plenty of good reason that players like BJ Upton who struggle defensively move from 2B to CF, not the other way around. I wouldn't have objected to Sizemore winning the MVP, but I do object to the constant crapping on second basemen that goes on.

Getting a ground ball and a fly ball is 2 different things.

2b is one of the easiest positions on the field to play.

A good CF will save singles, doubles, triples, and even hrs.

A good 2nd baseman will rarely save a double.

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Getting a ground ball and a fly ball is 2 different things.

This is true. However, how often do players successfully move to the middle infield after failing in the outfield? Getting to flyballs depends in large part on pure athletic ability. Of course positioning and instincts play a part, but positioning can be determined by a coach and signaled from the dugout (as with any position), and you see many average to above average CFs who frequently don't get good jumps on the ball but make up for it with their speed. CF may rely more on pure physical talent, but 2B takes more skill and consistent concentration as the player touches the ball much more frequently and has to make many plays other than fielding a batted ball, whereas the CF never covers a base, takes a throw, or has to avoid colliding with a baserunner.

2b is one of the easiest positions on the field to play.

This is simply factually untrue. Even if you value a CF's skills more highly than a 2B's, there are only 9 defensive positions on the field including pitcher, where fielding is not the main defensive function so you frequently have players at the position who really can't field it. Of the 8 "position player" positions, four of them are very clearly easier than 2B.

A good CF will save singles, doubles, triples, and even hrs.

A good 2nd baseman will rarely save a double.

Well then I guess shortstops and catchers aren't too important either. :P

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This is true. However, how often do players successfully move to the middle infield after failing in the outfield? Getting to flyballs depends in large part on pure athletic ability. Of course positioning and instincts play a part, but positioning can be determined by a coach and signaled from the dugout (as with any position), and you see many average to above average CFs who frequently don't get good jumps on the ball but make up for it with their speed. CF may rely more on pure physical talent, but 2B takes more skill and consistent concentration as the player touches the ball much more frequently and has to make many plays other than fielding a batted ball, whereas the CF never covers a base, takes a throw, or has to avoid colliding with a baserunner.

This is simply factually untrue. Even if you value a CF's skills more highly than a 2B's, there are only 9 defensive positions on the field including pitcher, where fielding is not the main defensive function so you frequently have players at the position who really can't field it. Of the 8 "position player" positions, four of them are very clearly easier than 2B.

Well then I guess shortstops and catchers aren't too important either. :P

I have played this game for many years. I have played all of the positions on the field, but 1st base. I can tell you LF is the easiest position to play. 2b is just behind it. You don't need a strong arm to play 2nd base. It is also part of the reason why most of the "bad" kids in Little League/High School are the ones to play 2nd base.

The throw to 1st base is so easy. You can play so far back which will increase your range. You can even bobble the ball a little and still make the throw to 1st.

There are more RH hitters in the league. They hit the ball to Left side of 2nd base if they get good wood on it. LHs are the only ones that really drive the ball to the right side of 2nd base. But now in the MLB they do those stupid shifts for power hitting LH so the 2nd baseman is in Short RF.

I am not talking about value, but the actually plays a 2nd baseman has to make. To me it isn't even close. Now maybe 1st base is easier, I don't know, but I have my doubts though.

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I am not talking about value, but the actually plays a 2nd baseman has to make. To me it isn't even close. Now maybe 1st base is easier, I don't know, but I have my doubts though.
1B is definitely the easiest position to play on the diamond. By far. Especially at the major league level.
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