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Xavier Avery is #5


Tony-OH

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I am a little shocked here to be honest. I know his plate discipline is not top notch yet but I didn't think he would be behind someone who has not had very many plate appearances yet (95). Avery has as much potential as anyone and so far it looks like he is furfilling it. This might be looked at as a good thing because you must really hold Givens in high regard. Because they are the same age, Avery is two levels higher, and has more potential.

I know you have been really high on Givens in your write ups, their must be something really special here.

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I am a little shocked here to be honest. I know his plate discipline is not top notch yet but I didn't think he would be behind someone who has not had very many plate appearances yet (95). Avery has as much potential as anyone and so far it looks like he is furfilling it. This might be looked at as a good thing because you must really hold Givens in high regard. Because they are the same age, Avery is two levels higher, and has more potential.

I know you have been really high on Givens in your write ups, their must be something really special here.

I know this will probably be a controversial selection but in the end, I went with my gut and my gut likes Givens/Hoes slightly more. Honestly, all three are very close although one of them is slightly ahead of the other two in my opinion.

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Tony, in past years I thought your list measured the players with the highest potential or ceiling. This statement kind of throw me. "He has as much upside as anyone not named Manny Machado". If that is true I would have thought he would rank 2nd or 3rd.

Could you explain again how you rank the players? When you say you like a player more, what makes you like the player more? If it is not ceiling or potential what makes the determination in the ranking?

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Tony, in past years I thought your list measured the players with the highest potential or ceiling. This statement kind of throw me. "He has as much upside as anyone not named Manny Machado". If that is true I would have thought he would rank 2nd or 3rd.

Could you explain again how you rank the players? When you say you like a player more, what makes you like the player more? If it is not ceiling or potential what makes the determination in the ranking?

Potential has to be weighed by chances of reaching that potential. In my opinion, Avery's lack of plate discipline, although not a giant red flag, does give me concerns. The thing that gets most people excited about him as that he was a very raw player who has made a lot of adjustments to get to where he is so fast. It's a duel edged sword though because Avery really still needs to make improvements in just about every aspect of his game.

Again, when I looked at Avery, Givens and Hoes, I kinda see them all as very similar prospects when it comes to overall potential. Avery gets the slight nod in overall ceiling because he has the blazing speed that neither Hoes or Givens has although Hoes is faster than the slow footed Givens.

In the end, if I have guys that I consider pretty close, I go by my rule of which one would I want in my system if I could only have one. As it stands today, I'd choose the other two over Avery, mainly because both have shown better plate discipline.

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"Catches everything he gets to and has a solid arm in center, but some believe he'll ultimately end up in left field due to his lack of outfield instincts."

His projected role is everyday 2B/3B?

Cut and paste error, we'll get that fixed, sorry.

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I'm a little surprised, but not shocked. Tony's had a lot of good things to say about Givens lately and he's been pretty quiet about Avery. But Givens is going to need to make his move in 2011 to justify such a high ranking.

Remember, the write ups are more important than the rankings when you start deciding between who's 3rd, 4th and 5th. I think when you read Givens' write up you'll know why I like him.

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Potential has to be weighed by chances of reaching that potential. In my opinion, Avery's lack of plate discipline, although not a giant red flag, does give me concerns. The thing that gets most people excited about him as that he was a very raw player who has made a lot of adjustments to get to where he is so fast. It's a duel edged sword though because Avery really still needs to make improvements in just about every aspect of his game.

Again, when I looked at Avery, Givens and Hoes, I kinda see them all as very similar prospects when it comes to overall potential. Avery gets the slight nod in overall ceiling because he has the blazing speed that neither Hoes or Givens has although Hoes is faster than the slow footed Givens.

In the end, if I have guys that I consider pretty close, I go by my rule of which one would I want in my system if I could only have one. As it stands today, I'd choose the other two over Avery, mainly because both have shown better plate discipline.

Thanks for the insight. This game every year is to guess what Tony thinks. I am not very good at it. I am just trying to get better at it.

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