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Consecutive Innings Streak


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SABR just did some research into Cal's Inning streak.

http://sabr.org/latest/ripken-s-record-consecutive-innings-played

Ripken set the all-time record on August 31, 1985, when he completed the first inning against the Mariners. It was his 5,153rd inning in a row, besting George Pinkney's mark of 5,152. Pinkney had set the mark over six seasons from 1885 to 1890, playing mostly in the American Association.

Pinkney's record had lasted for 95 years. For comparison, when Ripken played in his 2,131st consecutive game in 1995, Lou Gehrig's streak of 2,130 games had existed for a mere fifty-six years. Also, whereas 46,272 people were in attendance when Ripken surpassed Gehrig (and millions more watched on television), a mere 21,472 fans saw Ripken break Pinkney's streak.

Freeman, on the other hand, fell short of his legend. He would have compiled a streak of 4,884 innings— the third-longest ever—if he had not been ejected at some point on September 9, 1903 (game 2), in the middle of the streak. Instead, he ends up with separate streaks of 2,935 and 1,943 innings.

Nice to see someone go and do the actual work of figuring out the details of the accomplishment.

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I'm still not as impressed with the innings streak. I'm sure there have been several players who had long consecutive games streaks who were pulled for a couple of innings during blowouts who just as easily could have played every inning of every game for several years.

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I'm still not as impressed with the innings streak. I'm sure there have been several players who had long consecutive games streaks who were pulled for a couple of innings during blowouts who just as easily could have played every inning of every game for several years.

See I am the opposite. Lou's streak was lessened in my eyes by the games in which he batting in the first and was replaced by a defensive switch in the bottom of the inning. Look at Freeman above, one ejection in a double header and Boom his streak is cut in half.

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Pinkney had the advantage of playing in an era where substitutes required the permission of the opposing team. There may have been some occasions where he wanted to come out but couldn't convince the other manager it was a good idea. I think it's pretty well documented that players occasionally had to finish out a game with pretty serious injuries because the other manager wanted to win, real bad.

Pinkney also played in an era with shorter schedules and more off days. He never played 150 games in a season, and would probably have had regular breaks of two or more days because of train travel. In 1886 he played 141 games in 179 days. In 1984, for example, Cal played 162 games in 181 days.

Then again, in the 1800s it was fairly common for players to miss time due to things like cholera or malaria.

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