Jump to content

Orioles and Wearable Biometrics


DrungoHazewood

Recommended Posts

From the IEEE Spectrum magazine this month, an article on a new wearable biometric data device that measures elbow stress. The Orioles seem to have been an early adopter and Rick Peterson is quoted in the piece:

The Baltimore Orioles bought eight sleeves, all for the club?s farm teams, says Rick Peterson, a director of pitching development for the team. ?My guess is it?s going to be a long time before the big league guys get into this, because they will not want to share this data,? he says. ?Big league players are so protective of their space. Their first question is: ?Can this be used against me?? ?

That question is particularly pertinent for amateurs competing for a position through the league?s draft system and for players who are looking to get a new contract. Biomechanics analysis could work in a player?s favor if his mechanics are good. But if the data show red flags that could lead to a major injury, he won?t be as desirable. Peterson says he already uses video footage to look for mechanics problems in potential draft picks, and biometrics data from wearables would be a likely next step.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Glad to see the Orioles involved with some forward thinking. A lot of posters are going to be happy about this and respect Rick Peterson. However our favorite NL Cy Young contender added stress to his elbow by throwing across his body. Peterson was around when we drafted Bundy and Harvey and they've both had elbow issues. Seems like as good as the technology gets it still is just a crapshoot.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I thought is was interesting that Peterson focused on the privacy and injury projection/impact on value angle here. To me the Orioles angle on this might be targeting the undervalued pitchers who're being tagged as high-risk. If you take those guys and either teach them mechanical changes that lower risk, or get them at a draft/price point that makes the risk acceptable (say, high short-term performance to go along with injury risk) you've found an advantage.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Biomechanical analysis is great for keeping guys from getting hurt, but it doesn't necessarily help make guys to be better pitchers. 9 times out of 10 Biomechanical analysis will tell you a guy should not throw across his body because it puts tremendous strain on the shoulder. But some guys (Arrieta) need to do that to be the best pitcher they can be.

I am starting to worry whether the Orioles have lost sight of developing pitchers by maximizing what they do best, rather than forming them into some platonic ideal they think they should be.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Biomechanical analysis is great for keeping guys from getting hurt, but it doesn't necessarily help make guys to be better pitchers. 9 times out of 10 Biomechanical analysis will tell you a guy should not throw across his body because it puts tremendous strain on the shoulder. But some guys (Arrieta) need to do that to be the best pitcher they can be.

I am starting to worry whether the Orioles have lost sight of developing pitchers by maximizing what they do best, rather than forming them into some platonic ideal they think they should be.

That's why I said you need to balance injury risk with effectiveness. The Orioles have shown the last several years that you can win if you have pretty good but not great pitchers who stay healthy. Would they have been better if Chen or Tillman had a higher-risk, higher-effectiveness delivery and one of them missed three months? Or ended up with Tommy John? All depends on timing.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

  • Posts

    • They better have Westburg jersey's in the team store.
    • That's fine.  That's a take with the appropriate amount of subtlety. The silly rhetorical questions, "How can he learn to hit ML pitching in AAA?" devised to produce a foregone conclusion have no such subtlety. 
    • We could also give up the farm for Jesus Luzardo, as was your plan in the offseason 
    • I’ll leave the player evaluations to you since it’s your specialty.  I just gave reasons why I don’t think we see Povich anytime soon.   
    • How about you give a confidence ranking & ratings (1-10) for those 5 guys to be reliable, productive starters. I would probably put Irvin a clear #1 of the 5, with a confidence level of about 6 out of 10
    • It's a very heavy International program offense since the Orioles rarely draft high school hitters. This is the first time many of these guys have hit in cold weather, so they get a bit of a pass so far. Saying that, the struggles are pretty disappointing, especially for Tavera and Arias, but they are at least not doing too bad in controlling the strike zone so far. Arias in the 7-day IL and hasn't played since April 13th.  Sosa has hit a lot of doubles, but the K's are too high. He's been walking more this last week so that's good.  Acevedo has been a disappointment for me. I keep waiting for him to breakout, but I think he just may be who he is, a toolsy guy that just doesn't have enough hit tool. Mordan can hit a little bit but doesn't have a position. The defense overall has been pretty bad too, with 4th most errors (25) in the Carolina League leading to 19 unearned runs and a lot of extra pitches.
    • I agree, and I don't really see it as Jordan just riding a hot streak. He probably won't end up 6th in MLB in WAR, like he is now, but I think he is going to be a very good player for many years to come. I love the way he plays. He hits it hard consistently, fields well at multiple positions, runs well and seems to be in the middle of most rallies. He brings back some memories of Bobby Grich to me, and I could see him having a Grich like career with multiple All-Star appearances.  I know there is a lot of young talent coming up, but I think there are going to be players moving around to other spots rather than pushing Jordan to a utility role or a trade. I see him in the lineup on an everyday basis for years to come, whether it is at 2B or 3B.
  • Popular Contributors

  • Popular Now

×
×
  • Create New...