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Goose Gossage says Rivera not best closer in history and Krod is a clown!


Gurgi

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I agree that KRod is a clown. He even showboats after recording sloppy and unimpressive saves.

As for the Rivera comment, I'm not surprised Goose puts a premium on pitching more than one inning. Thats what Goose did and he would like to draw the best closer circle around himself. Of course that is not fair to Rivera; he is being discounted simply for the culture and era of baseball he played in.

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I agree that KRod is a clown. He even showboats after recording sloppy and unimpressive saves.

As for the Rivera comment, I'm not surprised Goose puts a premium on pitching more than one inning. Thats what Goose did and he would like to draw the best closer circle around himself. Of course that is not fair to Rivera; he is being discounted simply for the culture and era of baseball he played in.

Rollie Fingers and Eckersly were both better closers than Gossage. There were also a coupld of NL closers who were better.

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Any player that goes by the lazy nickname "KRod" when his real first name doesn't even start with a K is a no doubter clown. His peripherals have been in decline for a few years now, so maybe when he has an average season this coming season, he'll revise his nickname to just "OKRod".

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Any player that goes by the lazy nickname "KRod" when his real first name doesn't even start with a K is a no doubter clown. His peripherals have been in decline for a few years now, so maybe when he has an average season this coming season, he'll revise his nickname to just "OKRod".

Let's be fair to the guy, not a fan, but he didn't give himself that name, it was given to him by overzealous fans and media.

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It's pretty easy to figure out who was the most valuable reliever of all time. There are all kinds of metrics that figure something like RAR and throw in a leverage index. I haven't looked up the numbers in a while, and I know that guys from Gossage's era do have an advantage in the sheer number of innings/games they'd throw. But guys from today generally have higher leverage indexes (indices?) so that each inning they throw is more important. You never have Rivera come into a four-run game in the 6th and throw 3-4 relatively meaningless innings, but he'd also pick up ~25 saves a year that were bascially one inning, nobody on, up by 2-3 runs.

You also have the fact that many good closers today like Hoffman or Rivera or Lee Smith were very consistent for many, many years. While in the 1970s you'd have a ton of guys who'd throw 125 innings to a 2.20 one year, then blow up the next and give you a 5.50. That's why the one-inning save came into being: 95% of pitchers can't handle throwing 120, 140, 160 innings in relief year after year.

Heck, you can look at Gossage's career as sort of a parallel of Cy Young's in a way - they both came up in eras where they were expected to work a ton of innings. But as they aged the demands on their positions decreased, lessening the strains on their arms, and strongly contributing to their ability to pitch for 20+ years.

In the end, I think the job description has changed but the value and importance is roughly the same. Oldtimers always think their job was harder, even though it usually wasn't. Gossage was as good as anyone in the 70s and early 80s, but Rivera is better than anyone since about 1990. Eck was great, but only for a few years.

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