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Steve Pearce is...


Al Pardo

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Hose him down,. This is ridiculous. And it's really a mirage. He is actually a .744 OPS player, so pay no attention to what appears to be happening on the field right now. Eventually he will turn into a pumpkin and be so bad that the runs he is creating will be subtracted. Over the past month his BA has gone down from .360 to .300 and his OBP has gone down from .424 to .318. His slugging is going up from .693 to .850. He is turning back into the all or nothing guy he really is.

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Oh man.

Where to start.

WHO CARES DUDE. Congratulations for stating the obvious that 100% of the board already knows: that Steve Pearce isn't really this good all the time. No!! REALLY??!!

Enough with this crap. The guy is hot and he's fun to watch. Let's enjoy it without sanctimoniously stating his career stats at every turn. We already know who Steve Pearce is, trust me.

Standing tall on your soapbox today, eh Dan? Wow.

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Oh man.

Where to start.

WHO CARES DUDE. Congratulations for stating the obvious that 100% of the board already knows: that Steve Pearce isn't really this good all the time. No!! REALLY??!!

Enough with this crap. The guy is hot and he's fun to watch. Let's enjoy it without sanctimoniously stating his career stats at every turn for the sake of buzz killing. Because that's all it is - buzzkill for the sake of buzzkill. We already know who Steve Pearce is, trust me.

Just practicing my Drungo impression. Excuse me. :drungo::P
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Hose him down,. This is ridiculous. And it's really a mirage. He is actually a .744 OPS player, so pay no attention to what appears to be happening on the field right now. Eventually he will turn into a pumpkin and be so bad that the runs he is creating will be subtracted. Over the past month his BA has gone down from .360 to .300 and his OBP has gone down from .424 to .318. His slugging is going up from .693 to .850. He is turning back into the all or nothing guy he really is.

When a 31-year-old has provided 82% of his career value in his last 165 PAs you should definitely pencil (sorry, permanent Sharpie) him in for a regular gig on the All Star team for the next 4-5 years.

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Oh man.

Where to start.

WHO CARES DUDE. Congratulations for stating the obvious that 100% of the board already knows: that Steve Pearce isn't really this good all the time. No!! REALLY??!!

Enough with this crap. The guy is hot and he's fun to watch. Let's enjoy it without sanctimoniously stating his career stats at every turn for the sake of buzz killing. Because that's all it is - buzzkill for the sake of buzzkill. We already know who Steve Pearce is, trust me.

:wedge: You do dude.................... :agree:

I get sick of the WAR this, OPS this, etc.... I look at stats too, but not every breathing moment.

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Gordo's favorite pastime is to hyperbolically exaggerate a stereotype of me hyperbolically exaggerating.
Exactly. Which is hyperbolic Drungo and which is Gordo's hyperbolic exaggeration? That's the question.

jimmy-durante.jpg

I sometimes have trouble telling the difference myself.

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I refuse to give into cynicism. Much more unlikely things have happened then a 31 year old baseball player exploding into stardom after spending a long time as a role player. Do I expect it to happen? No. But those citing advanced metrics and totally discounting the possibility are cheating themselves of the joy of the moment and the hope for more to come. Life is hard to define and explain. Baseball is impossible to completely quantify, even for actuaries. So, I will enjoy the moment and hope for more, fWar be damned.

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I refuse to give into cynicism. Much more unlikely things have happened then a 31 year old baseball player exploding into stardom after spending a long time as a role player. Do I expect it to happen? No. But those citing advanced metrics and totally discounting the possibility are cheating themselves of the joy of the moment and the hope for more to come. Life is hard to define and explain. Baseball is impossible to completely quantify, even for actuaries. So, I will enjoy the moment and hope for more, fWar be damned.
To say his career numbers suggest it's unlikely, is not the same as totally discounting the possibility. At least not in English.
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I refuse to give into cynicism. Much more unlikely things have happened then a 31 year old baseball player exploding into stardom after spending a long time as a role player.

Through age 30 Steve Pearce had played 290 MLB games and totaled 0.6 rWAR. There have been about 2000 non-pitchers who roughly matched that criteria (played 100+ games through age 30, rWAR < 1.0)

The best players on that list from age 31-on include Frank Baumholtz, John Vander Wal, Kaz Matsui, Buck Martinez, and Augie Ojeda.

I'm rooting for Pearce to be a productive player for a long time for the Orioles. But in some ways that would be unprecedented. Even stretching the definitions a bit you get a few guys like Lee Stevens. It's very, very rare to be unproductive in your 20s and a star in your 30s. For a position player. It's just rare for a pitcher.

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Through age 30 Steve Pearce had played 290 MLB games and totaled 0.6 rWAR. There have been about 2000 non-pitchers who roughly matched that criteria (played 100+ games through age 30, rWAR < 1.0)

He had 847 PA in that span, a good amount of it pinch-hitting. It's come out to 212 games if you count a more regular 4 PA/G. Not that this changes your point too much.

He seems like a Luke Scott type to me. Always solid in the minors, never found a real opening in the majors. Maybe a year or two of solid hitting left.

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He had 847 PA in that span, a good amount of it pinch-hitting. It's come out to 212 games if you count a more regular 4 PA/G. Not that this changes your point too much.

He seems like a Luke Scott type to me. Always solid in the minors, never found a real opening in the majors. Maybe a year or two of solid hitting left.

I kind of like the Vander Wal comp. He pinch hit a lot, too.

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